Scrapbook: The Stanstead Journal Thursday November 19, 1959

Lately, since my involvement with FWIC and Addie and the staff at the homestead, I’ve been knee-deep in reading and googling and wall-to-wall history about the WI and Mrs. Hoodless. I kinda wish now that I had studied history formally at school, way back when.

Oh well, no time for “coulda/woulda/shoulda” and no time like the present to start a scrapbook of the bits and pieces I find about my new heroine, Adelaide Hunter Hoodless and anything to do with the WI.

The article linked to the image below describes the purchase of the Hoodless Homestead. I think Ms. Wilson (no relation!) may have taken some poetic licence when she describes Addie’s walk to school:

It was here that Addie Hunter was born and romped about, skipped across the road to the barn, down to the spring in the willows, and walked the mile and a quarter to school.

The closing paragraph is almost prophetic for it ties into the theme Planting Seeds of Change for next year’s Triennial convention in June.

Already many WI members from Canada and other parts of the world have journeyed to the cairn erected by the Brant County Women’s Institutes to commemorate the birthplace. How much more interesting will be the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Museum, where one can imagine she sees the domestic circle where the seeds for the enrichment of rural homes around the world were nurtured – the vision of a woman born in this humble farm home 100 years ago.

***

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Addie’s Pudding Sauces

beeton_xmas_plum_pudding_1890sWhen I was a girl, for Christmas dinner mom served what she called “Plum Pudding“. She purchased it from the grocer. It was such a memorable treat that a few years ago, I thought I’d try to make my own. “No grocery store stuff for this gal!” I said with a sniff.

The outcome was rich and sweet and yummy, but the work involved! That discovery was an epiphany of sorts. Sorry, Mom, I owe you an apology for being a pudding snob.

victorian plum pudding

Mom did make the lemon sauce for the pudding, though. Since then, I’ve learned there are about as many variations of sauce for the Christmas pudding as there are cooks. Our Adelaide Hunter Hoodless offers several recipes in her “Little Red Book.”

PUDDING SAUCES.

Plain Sauce.
1 cup water.
1 tsp. butter.
1/2 ssp. grated nutmeg.
3 tbsps. sugar.
2 tsps. flour or cornstarch.
Melt the butter and flour together, stir in the hot water, add the sugar and flavoring, cook until smooth and clear.

Molasses Sauce.
1/2 cup molasses.
1/2 cup water or 1/2 tbsp. vinegar.
2 (l.) tsps. flour.
1/2 cup sugar.
1 tbsp. lemon juice.
1 tbsp. butter.
1/2 ssp. salt.
Mix the flour and sugar together. Pour the boiling water upon it. Add the molasses and place on the range. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add the other ingredients; boil up once and serve. (Omit lemon if vinegar is used.)

Cream Sauce.
1 egg.
1 tsp. butter.
1 tsp. cornstarch.
1/2 cup powdered sugar.
1 tsp. vanilla.
1 cup boiling milk.
Beat the white of the egg to a stiff froth; then gradually beat into it the powdered sugar and cornstarch. Next add the yolk of the egg and beat well. Pour upon this the cupful of boiling milk and place on the fire. Stir until it boils, then add the butter and vanilla.

Lemon Sauce.
1 tbsp. cornstarch.
1/2 cup sugar.
1 pint boiling water.
1 tbsp. butter.
1 egg.
1 lemon.
Beat the egg, add the cornstarch and sugar, stir them well together; add the boiling water gradually and stir over the fire until thick; add the butter, juice and grated rind of one lemon. Serve hot.

Vanilla Sauce.
1 cup milk.
2 (l.) tbsps. sugar.
2 eggs.
1/2 tsp. vanilla.
Put the milk on to boil, beat the yolks and sugar till very light; add them to the boiling milk; stir over the fire until creamy. Have the whites beaten, pour over them the boiling mixture; beat thoroughly and serve at once.

***

From

PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE BY MRS. J. HOODLESS, [Adelaide Hunter Hoodless]
President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by a resolution of the Trustees. TORONTO:THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,1898.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Incredibly Creamy Rice Pudding

Click for Image Soure
Click for Image Soure

It’s cold and I need an excuse to heat the kitchen. Time to cook.

This recipe for rice pudding might be a bit different from the one you are used to. It calls for short grain rice, or Italian style or Arborio rice, the kind that is used in risotto. Arborio is the key ingredient to this dessert, as it lends a delectable creaminess even if you use low- or no-fat milk. I’ve made it dozens of times and can’t recommend it enough. The only trick is to remember to stir the pot to keep the mixture from scorching.

Arborio Rice Pudding
makes about 6 servings

2 minutes to assemble, about an hour to cook.

1/2 cup Arborio rice
4 cups milk (skim works just fine)
1/4 cup sugar (I’ve been known to omit the sugar, as long as I used raisins.)
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 cup raisins (optional)
1/2 tsp vanilla extract (to taste)

Sprinkling of cinnamon at serving time

In a medium heavy-bottomed sauce pan, place rice, milk, sugar, and salt; stir. Bring just to a boil; stirring often. Add raisins if using; reduce heat to very low and stir frequently for about 50 minutes until the rice is plump and creamy (see note below). Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Serve immediately or transfer to a storage container and cover the surface with plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming; chill completely.

Sprinkle with a little cinnamon before serving.

Note: If you plan to serve the rice pudding hot, cook to desired serving consistency. If you plan to serve it cold, it will firm up when chilled so stop cooking when the consistency is a bit looser than you want. If you find your chilled rice pudding is too firm, stir in a little milk.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Membership Monday: Three Generations at Calhoun WI

From time to time as part of Membership Monday, we will post an article to profile a Women’s Institute Branch. As you might expect, each branch will have many similar characteristics. But each will have its own particular history, successes and challenges. Today we kick off the series with a profile of the Calhoun WI from New Brunswick.

Roll call!

Kim Légère, the youngest member, has been part of the Calhoun WI since 1996. Her grandmother, Hazel Lewis hosted the first meeting of the branch when it formed in September 1952.

Eileen Toole, a founding member is still active with the group. She has held many positions at the branch and district level.

In between these two women sit three… count ‘em, one, two, three others to complete the small but mighty WI. These five active members meet the third Wednesday of each month excluding the summer months of July and August.

Kim contacted FWIC to discuss membership.  “I would love to see the Calhoun WI group grow in vast numbers,” says Kim. As a small child, she recalls her mother hosting the WI meeting where there were thirty or forty members in attendance. “Not that many years ago when women were homemakers they enjoyed the evening out, but with today’s hectic schedules women find it hard to commit to another scheduled outing.” Unfortunately, over the years, Calhoun’s membership has declined.

 “I would love to see the Calhoun WI group grow in vast numbers,”

Both Kim and Carolyn O’Hanley, the president of Calhoun WI described the regular events as well as the special projects undertaken by the members.

The Calhoun branch is responsible for the street lights that their stand-alone community has enjoyed for ten years.  This was accomplished through canvassing and petitioning the community residents. Provincial speakers were invited to meetings which were held in the only place available, the local community church.  Finally, the lights were installed.

Calhoun WI was part of The Adopt a Highway Program until last year when the Province of New Brunswick decreased funding to the Department of Environment.  The group has hopes that the newly elected government will grant funding for this project. The WI is watchful regarding the safety of roads in the area, too. They report to the government officials regarding the over-growth of bush and grass along Calhoun Road.  Last year the government contracted out a major maintenance project to attend to this issue, something that might not have occurred if it were not for the diligent urging by the Calhoun WI.

Also in the community, the WI supports the breakfast program at one of the schools close to Calhoun, and each year they provide scholarships to high-school graduates. The members visit and send cards to those who are sick or shut-in, and they remember the bereaved in the community. The group also supports the local church with donations of supplies such as bath tissue, soap, and cleaners.

Each summer the group takes part in an outing and members invite a spouse or a friend for a social evening out with dinner. For example, one year they travelled to Dorchester and toured the Keillor House and had lunch at the Bell Inn. The women also meet for lunch as a group during the summer.  One such event included a visit to the Boardwalk at Magnetic Hill. And of course, since it was summer, there was ice cream! Each Christmas members enjoy a festive restaurant dinner with their spouses. They also exchange gifts.

keillor

Bell InbFundraising events include

  • Raffle tickets on a handmade quilt and a basket of goodies.
  • Vessey’s bulb fundraiser
  • Brown bag auction or Harvest Goodies are sold at the meeting
  • Cold plate turkey suppers
  • Valentine teas and monthly teas
  • Quilting bees
Veseys Seeds Fundraiser Program - click on the image for details
Veseys Seeds Fundraiser Program – click on the image for details

Kim’s thirteen year-old daughter, has three cousins who live close by and all of them love the women of the WI and look forward to joining when they are older.

“I know that my grandmother Hazel would be proud to think that her daughter Wanda, her granddaughter Kim are members of the WI and that her great-granddaughter Sarah plans to join.”

As you can see, a small but mighty group indeed. The main challenge is the number of members. Kim would dearly love to see the group grow to vast numbers.

So would we.

If you have any words of encouragement or suggestions for Calhoun, they’d love to hear from you. Please feel free to share this story with your memberships, too.

Mince Meat Hermits

Click on image for source
Click on image for source

Carol MacLellan, FWIC Executive Officer from PEI writes:

Realizing I still had some mince meat left over, I came across this recipe of my Mother-in-laws and decided to try it. They were delicious, hearty, and made a big batch!

Mince Meat Hermits

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Mix in the following order:

½ cup butter
½ cup shortening (I used the yellow shortening for the combined cup)
½ cup brown sugar packed
2 eggs
1 ¼ cup mince meat
1 cup chopped nuts
3 ½ cups flour
1 tsp. soda
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
½ tsp. nutmeg
¼ tsp. cloves

Drop by spoon onto cookie sheet. Bake for 12 minutes.

Enjoy!

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Scrap Ribbon Christmas Ornament

Materials Needed:

Sticks (6″ in length)
Ribbon scraps (shades of green and brown work well)
Hot glue gun
Twine
Scissors

Directions:
1. Tie the scraps of ribbon down the stick.
2. Trim the ribbon scraps into the shape of a Christmas tree. After trimming, carefully melt the edges of the ribbons with a candle so the ribbon doesn’t fray.
3. Use the hot glue to attach a piece of twine to the top so the ornament can hang.
These ornaments are beautifully rustic, simple, and can be a fun snowy day craft for the kids!

From the December 2014 Take 10 Bulletin

Scrap-Ribbon-Tree-Ornament1
Click on image for the Fireflies and Mud Pies Blog
scrap-ribbon-tree-ornament-5
Click on the image for the Fireflies and Mud Pies blog

 

 ***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Women on Banknotes

 

women on banknotes

Click on the image above to access the Change.org petition created by Merna Forster.

Please sign the petition.

You might want to nominate a certain favourite Canadian woman of your own.

We, of course, are happy to see that Addie has been endorsed.

Click on the photo below to add to the discussion, if you like.

addie on banknote

 ***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Natalie’s Crustless Cranberry Pie

crustless cranberry pie

It is seasonal, great for Christmas, and the beauty of it is you don’t have to make pie crust which some people hate doing! It is from PEI.

Carol

 This looks oh so good and fewer calories with only one crust.

Marie

This is from Natalie Mawhinney. I tried it yesterday and it was great, especially with ice cream! You should try it with your cranberries! Great with ice cream!

Carol

What’s not to love? Easy, fewer calories, and great with ice cream! (I know, ice cream has calories. I’m going with the good thing and ignoring the rest!)

Natalie’s Crustless Cranberry Pie

Heat oven to 325 and grease pie plate

Add in layers:
2 cups cranberries on the bottom of the pie plate
1/2 cup walnuts (optional)
1/2 cup sugar

Mix together the following:
1 cup flour
1 cup white sugar
1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs, beaten
1 tsp almond extract

Add to the pie plate.

Bake 30-40 minutes.

Notes from the cook: Natalie does not use walnuts. She has also made this using rhubarb. If cranberries are frozen mixture will be very thick.

[Update:  I made this last night. Yummy doesn’t begin to describe it. OK, yes, Yummy describes it, but so does sweetly tart, rich, and delicious. It took about twice as long to bake the dough, however, so be prepared to adjust the timing. I’m having some now. For breakfast.]

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Membership Monday

I <3 Google

Google is my friend and I’d be lost without the search engine. I use it daily to complete my school assignments, my mineral hobby and especially for my volunteer work with FWIC.

I use Google News, too. It has an “alerts” feature. I have registered to receive an email notice “as it happens.” As what happens, you ask? “It” is the posting of any internet content that includes the terms, “women’s institute.”

Many of the Canadian WI’s, especially those in the eastern provinces make great use of the local newspapers to announce events and to promote their cause. I receive about one notice every other day.

Here’s something else you should know about me. I <3 email. Call me crazy, but I love seeing lots of emails in my inbox. Which leads me to the theme of this post:

I hereby challenge you to a… um, to a challenge! I would like to double the notices I receive from Google News. That means I need your help.

According to the International Public Library media database that lists newspapers and magazines worldwide, there are over 130 publications in Canada. Can you imagine how full my inbox would be if I had a notice from  130 news outlets? I’d be over the moon! (I may eat my words, too, but that will be material for a future post if this challenge is a success!)

Click on the image below and you will land on the International Public Library site all set up and ready to search on Canadian media outlets. Find your local newspaper and surf on over and find the contact information for the letters to the editor, the community news, the “what’s on” pages…whatever suits your fancy or your needs.

I look forward to hearing from you. Or from Google News. Or both!

IPL2

 

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Addie’s Potato Soup

Winter is upon us. Time for comfort food. This potato soup recipe is from Addie’s cookbook.

Potato Soup

4 potatoes, medium size.
2 tbsps. minced celery.
2 tbsps. of flour.
1/4 tsp. of pepper.
1/2 tsp. minced parsley.
1-1/2 pints of milk.
4 tbsps. minced onions.
1 tsp. of salt.
1 tbsp. of butter.

Pare the potatoes, place on the fire in enough boiling water to cover, and cook for 30 minutes.

Reserve 1/2 cup milk, put the remainder in the double boiler with the onion and celery and place on the fire.

Mix the cold milk with the flour and stir into the boiling milk.

When the potatoes are cooked pour off the water, mash them until fine and light. Gradually beat into them the milk; now add salt, pepper and butter, and rub the soup through a sieve.

Return to the fire and add the minced parsley; simmer for 5 minutes and serve immediately. (The parsley may be omitted and celery salt substituted for the minced celery.)

From
PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE BY MRS. J. HOODLESS, [Adelaide Hunter Hoodless]
President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by a resolution of the Trustees. TORONTO:THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,1898.
creamofpotatosoupmainjpg

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.