Addie’s Apples II

About a year ago, I shared a couple of Adelaide Hunter Hoodless’ apple recipes with you. Click on this link if you’d like to re-read that post.

This year, I want to share with you (read: brag about) my recent triumph in the pie-making department. One of the members of the Women Inspiring Women WI is a prize-winning pastry maker. Elaine Tully will hold a couple of workshops later this fall for our WI, but first she wanted to have a technical rehearsal at the church kitchen. There I made my first ever peach pie. OH. EM. GEE. as they say. It was wonderful good!

Just peachy!
Just peachy!

Yesterday, I made an apple pie using Addie’s Apples. Literally. These apples were picked from the trees at the Homestead.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
I don’t know the variety of apple, but the flesh is crisp and tart. It held up well in the baking. I’m going to pick more this week and make applesauce.
Addie's Apples before...
Addie’s Apples before…
... and after.
… and after.

My hubby tried an apple fresh and found them rather tart. When I told him that I had made a pie he asked, “Did you put in lots of sugar?” Of course, I did, we’re talking brown sugar here!

The secret to success? Cold ingredients and limit handling: keys to fantastic pie crust. I used the pie crust recipe on the Crisco box and Edna Staebler’s Double Crust Apple Pie filling, copied here:

  • 3 cups of peeled, cored, and sliced apples (I used 4 cups. Next time I will use more – the crust to fruit ratio can use some tweaking)

Toss the apples in with the following:

  • 2/3 to 1 cup sugar, depending on tartness of apples
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg (I omitted this – too lazy to grate the nutmeg)
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Place in pie shell and dot with

  • 2 or 3 tablespoons of butter
  • 2 tablespoons of milk or cream

Cover with the top crust, flute edges, and slash the top to create vents for steam to escape.

Bake at 375 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes until the crusts are a pale golden colour.

***

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award

The collective impact of our country’s female leaders cannot be understated.

Introducing: The Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award is the premier national award of Women’s Institute celebrating the achievements of the most successful in this inspiring group. This award recognizes a woman for demonstrating excellence—from leadership to social change, from local to global reach, across multiple sectors. We are honored to shine a spotlight on her.

Nominations Now Open
We have a wonderful opportunity to recognize some of the top female leaders in Canada through the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award. These women do not have to be members of Women’s Institute. This Award seeks to acknowledge dedicated women whose contributions make their communities and our world a better place to live.

Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award recognizes the hard work, dedication, and support that these women have offered and continue to offer as they give leadership, inspire others, and make a difference while exhibiting the qualities of Adelaide Hunter Hoodless, the founder of the Women’s Institute Organization. Adelaide Hoodless dedicated her life to ensure women had educational opportunities. Adelaide Hoodless was called “one of the most famous Canadian women…yet one of the most obscure.” She is credited as being co-founder of the Women’s Institute, the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), the National Council of Women, the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON), and a major force behind the formation of three faculties of Household Science.

Adelaide Hoodless exemplified women supporting women, through education, encouragement, and social action.

To nominate yourself or a friend, please complete the one page nomination form downloadable from the FWIC website and submit it to fwican@gmail.com.

Nominees will be judged based on the leadership they have exhibited and the ways they have given back to community by mentoring or supporting other women.

Nominations will close at midnight on December 31st each year and winners will be notified in February.

Please contact your WI provincial office or visit our website for the one page application. Please note nominations are open to all living Canadian women who inspire others and work for positive change for their community or country. Applications are due to FWIC by December 31 of each year.

Dr. Ellen McLean being presented with the award in her home by Nova Scotia WI member Eleanor Lilley.
Dr. Ellen McLean being presented with the award in her home by Nova Scotia WI member Eleanor Lilley.

Congratulations to Dr. Ellen McLean of Nova Scotia for being the premiere recipient of The Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Fundraising with Victorian Flare

Fall is upon us and that means two things for those of us WI gals in Brant County:

  1. The St. George Applefest.
  2. And a return to our regular scheduled WI program.

Festival organizer Jean Tucker wrote in a March 2015 press release, “The 30th anniversary edition of St. George AppleFest was recently selected as one of the Top 100 Festivals & Events in Ontario (out of 2,500 events) by Festivals & Events Ontario (FEO). Nestled centrally to Cambridge, Paris and Brantford, St. George is blessed with apple blossoms in the spring and a fresh crop of apples in the fall. At this time of year our community “comes alive” and hosts a fantastic festival highlighting apples, pies, crafts, artisans, live entertainment, kids’ rides and much more.”

The event is held in and around the center of town adjacent to the gorgeous Sunnyside Mansion presently owned by David Bailey. This year, David has invited Women Inspiring Women WI to host an Open House and Victorian Fair during the St. George Applefest. The public will get a rare opportunity to take in some history in one of Brant County’s most historic homes.

Sunnyside fundraiserSunnyside stands as a memorial to its former owners, Dr. and Mrs. E.E. Kitchen, who contributed much to the life and times of their era and to their community. Dr. Kitchen’s wife, Annie Charlton, was a friend of Mrs. Adelaide Hunter Hoodless, founder of the Women’s Institute. Mrs. Kitchen supported Mrs. Hoodless in her work by holding Women’s Institute meetings at Sunnyside.*

The Sunnyside Mansion was built at 13 Main St. South, St. George in 1888 and is very rarely opened to the public. Events on September 19th will include a partial home tour, Victorian­-style games, music in the parlour room, tea & refreshments and a silent auction. The event will be open to the public, with admission by donation at the door. Proceeds are in support of the Brant Community Foundation’s David Bailey Legacy Fund and Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead, home to the founder of the Women’s Institute. The event holds special significance for Brant County WI members as the very first meeting of the St. George Branch was hosted here in 1903.

The mansion gained recent notoriety as a film set for the popular Canadian detective drama Murdoch Mysteries. Members of the Women Inspiring Women W.I, local historians in period costumes, local dignitaries, and the public will be on hand to celebrate the unique peek back in time.

Apple Blossom Recipe on YouTube - click on through
Apple Blossom Recipe on YouTube – click on through

On the Facebook Event page, organizer Andrea Roddy invites WI members and friends to volunteer for the weekend. Email invitations for volunteer sign-ups have been sent to all WIW WI members. You can also access the sign-up by following these 3 easy steps:

1) Click this link to see our Sign-Up on VolunteerSpot: http://vols.pt/J5F8us
2) Review the options listed and choose the spot(s) you like.
3) Sign up! It’s Easy – you will NOT need to register an account or keep a password on VolunteerSpot.

Note: VolunteerSpot does not share your email address with anyone. If you prefer not to use your email address, please contact Andrea and she can sign you up manually.

Applefest runs Saturday September 19th 10 AM – 6 PM and Sunday September 20th 10 AM – 5 PM.

Sunnyside Open House ­ hosted by the Women Inspiring Women W.I. at 13 Main Street South, St. George, Ontario Saturday, September 19th, 2015 @ 10am ­ 4pm

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.