New Exhibit at the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead Museum

What a perfect day we had for the new exhibit open house at the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Museum!

Joanna Rickert-Hall, in her new role as Curator of the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead, guided visitors through the new exhibit, “The Empty Crib: Legacy After Loss”.

For the last eight months, Ms. Rickert-Hall has been working at the museum as the Exhibit Developer under the Job Creation Partnership grant from the Ontario government. In that time she has conducted in-depth research, and asked contemporary questions about Adelaide and her legacy. The result is a transformative new look at the driving force behind the establishment of the International Women’s Institute Movement, the National Council of Women of Canada, the VON and the YWCA in Canada.

The Hoodless Homestead season runs from May 3 to Oct 31, 2015.

Please enjoy the images here courtesy our volunteer extraordinaire, Sara Naim!

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Scrapbook: The Stanstead Journal Thursday November 19, 1959

Lately, since my involvement with FWIC and Addie and the staff at the homestead, I’ve been knee-deep in reading and googling and wall-to-wall history about the WI and Mrs. Hoodless. I kinda wish now that I had studied history formally at school, way back when.

Oh well, no time for “coulda/woulda/shoulda” and no time like the present to start a scrapbook of the bits and pieces I find about my new heroine, Adelaide Hunter Hoodless and anything to do with the WI.

The article linked to the image below describes the purchase of the Hoodless Homestead. I think Ms. Wilson (no relation!) may have taken some poetic licence when she describes Addie’s walk to school:

It was here that Addie Hunter was born and romped about, skipped across the road to the barn, down to the spring in the willows, and walked the mile and a quarter to school.

The closing paragraph is almost prophetic for it ties into the theme Planting Seeds of Change for next year’s Triennial convention in June.

Already many WI members from Canada and other parts of the world have journeyed to the cairn erected by the Brant County Women’s Institutes to commemorate the birthplace. How much more interesting will be the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Museum, where one can imagine she sees the domestic circle where the seeds for the enrichment of rural homes around the world were nurtured – the vision of a woman born in this humble farm home 100 years ago.

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Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Rosemary-Lemon Chicken Skewers

Earlier this month Kate, FWIC’s executive director, hosted a potluck dinner to thank the hard-working volunteers at FWIC and the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead. You may recognize the photo here from Facebook or Twitter. If the smiling faces are any indication, a good time was had by all. Kate said, “We thought the “antlers” would makes us look distinctly “Canadian” for the #IAmWI campaign.” Works for me!

There was plenty of food, as is always the case at a potluck! Special requests went our for Mary Lee’s Rosemary-Lemon Chicken Skewers.

Rosemary-Lemon Chicken Skewers.
Soak small wooden skewers in water for approx 25 mins.
Cut 5 chicken breasts into  1/4″ thick slices
Combine the following
1/2 c olive oil
1 tsp lemon juice
1/2 c ranch dressing
1 tsp white vinegar
3 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp minced fresh rosemary
1/4 tsp pepper
1-2 tsp salt
Put chicken pieces in mixture and cover. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.  Mary Lee put it in the fridge over night.
Skewer the chicken pieces and grill on the BBQ.
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Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

2014 Summer Fete at Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead

Summer Fete 2014 was held August 10th, 2014 at the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead. The weather cooperated and we’re glad it did.

This gallery is a compilation of photos taken by Homestead staff and members of the press who came to record the fun and festivities. People of all ages took part in the garden party, a tour through the homestead, games, and music; they had their wee face painted and they petted the farm animals, including Harry the Goat! As well, there was a chance to interact with local vendors & demonstrators.

Susan Gamble of Sun Media spoke with volunteer co-ordinator Kate Belair about The Homestead on Blue Lake Road and the Summer Fete.

Today is our third annual event and we’re just trying to bring the community together. We don’t charge the vendors and we don’t charge visitors. We just hope people will learn about the place, our programs and Adelaide.