The Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award

The collective impact of our country’s female leaders cannot be understated.

Introducing: The Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award is the premier national award of Women’s Institute celebrating the achievements of the most successful in this inspiring group. This award recognizes a woman for demonstrating excellence—from leadership to social change, from local to global reach, across multiple sectors. We are honored to shine a spotlight on her.

Nominations Now Open
We have a wonderful opportunity to recognize some of the top female leaders in Canada through the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award. These women do not have to be members of Women’s Institute. This Award seeks to acknowledge dedicated women whose contributions make their communities and our world a better place to live.

Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award recognizes the hard work, dedication, and support that these women have offered and continue to offer as they give leadership, inspire others, and make a difference while exhibiting the qualities of Adelaide Hunter Hoodless, the founder of the Women’s Institute Organization. Adelaide Hoodless dedicated her life to ensure women had educational opportunities. Adelaide Hoodless was called “one of the most famous Canadian women…yet one of the most obscure.” She is credited as being co-founder of the Women’s Institute, the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), the National Council of Women, the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON), and a major force behind the formation of three faculties of Household Science.

Adelaide Hoodless exemplified women supporting women, through education, encouragement, and social action.

To nominate yourself or a friend, please complete the one page nomination form downloadable from the FWIC website and submit it to fwican@gmail.com.

Nominees will be judged based on the leadership they have exhibited and the ways they have given back to community by mentoring or supporting other women.

Nominations will close at midnight on December 31st each year and winners will be notified in February.

Please contact your WI provincial office or visit our website for the one page application. Please note nominations are open to all living Canadian women who inspire others and work for positive change for their community or country. Applications are due to FWIC by December 31 of each year.

Dr. Ellen McLean being presented with the award in her home by Nova Scotia WI member Eleanor Lilley.
Dr. Ellen McLean being presented with the award in her home by Nova Scotia WI member Eleanor Lilley.

Congratulations to Dr. Ellen McLean of Nova Scotia for being the premiere recipient of The Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year.

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

A New Year’s Resolution

Jar Project

Here is something that I’m going to try this year. It is part of my plan to include more kindness and generosity and other positive elements in my life. I know that there are plenty of good things going on all of the time, but my focus is elsewhere. Keeping a jar/journal/blog will help me simply recognize the good things when they happen.

Many years ago, the members of our household kept a house journal on the kitchen table and we’d all write in it whenever the urge hit. “Deer in the yard today – at least a dozen” or “Family for Thanksgiving” or the daughter drew a picture of her boyfriend… stuff like that. It was sort of like a manual of daily statuses. Pre-blogging or Facebook. That was fun.

We know we have challenges and trials and tribulations. No need to be reminded of those. The harder bits of life have a way of dominating our world and shoving aside the smaller but nourishing good bits. You might like to do this for your family, or for your WI. Keep a record of the small victories. Then, at the end of the year, or whenever the need arises, take the time to read and remember.

Happy New Year to you!

 

Membership Monday – Meet Sheila Needham

Sheila Needham
Sheila Needham

“We’re not good at tooting our own horn,” says Sheila Needham. Allow me, then, to share what I have learned about this WI gal!

As you will recall from a recent Membership Monday, Sheila Needham, the editor of the Quebec Women’s Institute Newsletter, graciously agreed that we could reprint the pictures and summarize the content of the Autumn/Winter issue. Her name has appeared here before on the FWIC blog. It was Sheila who alerted us to the fundraising projects undertaken by the Canadian WI’s in support of the Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW). Sheila is the editor of the ACWW newsletter as well.

The ACWW has had a hand in improving the lives of women from all walks of life, and by extension, society as a whole. Endeavours include building hospitals, lobbying for access to fresh water, or funding projects to educate and empower women.

As it happens, our Sheila, who was recently elected Canada Area President of the ACWW, has been discovered by more than just yours truly. Not only did CBC Radio’s Susan Campbell interview her, Matthew McCully of the Serbrooke Record wrote a wonder profile piece titled Sheila Needham-Think locally, act globally. 

Sheila joined the WI 42 years ago. “My mother-in-law brought me to a meeting when I was first married,” she said. “I think that’s how most women get involved; a mother, a friend, an aunt, someone invites you to a meeting.”

To read more about this inspirational woman, click on the link below to download a .pdf copy of the newspaper article.

Record article about Sheila Needham

After you read the article, drop on by to Sheila’s Facebook page to wish her a happy birthday!

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About WI

Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Women on Banknotes

 

women on banknotes

Click on the image above to access the Change.org petition created by Merna Forster.

Please sign the petition.

You might want to nominate a certain favourite Canadian woman of your own.

We, of course, are happy to see that Addie has been endorsed.

Click on the photo below to add to the discussion, if you like.

addie on banknote

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Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

In Flanders Now

Edna JaquesThis poem by Edna Jaques was read at the recent Federation meeting in Manitoba. Jaques wrote her poem as a reply to “In Flanders’ Field” by fellow Canadian WW1 poet, John McCrae.

In Flanders Now

We have kept faith, ye Flanders’ dead,
Sleep well beneath those poppies red,
That mark your place.
The torch your dying hands did throw,
We’ve held it high before the foe,
And answered bitter blow for blow,
In Flanders’ fields.

And where your heroes’ blood was spilled,
The guns are now forever stilled,
And silent grown.
There is no moaning of the slain,
There is no cry of tortured pain,
And blood will never flow again
In Flanders’ fields.

Forever holy in our sight
Shall be those crosses gleaming white,
That guard your sleep.
Rest you in peace, the task is done,
The fight you left us we have won.
And “Peace on Earth” has just begun
In Flanders now.

Edna Jaques was a lecturer, author and poet. She was a popular figure throughout Canada. Her poems sometimes depicted the harsh beauty of the Prairies, but above all they celebrated the daily experience of domestic life.

Born in Collingwood, Ontario on January 17, 1891, she moved with her family to a homestead southeast of Moosejaw in 1902. Her education included business college in Vancouver, in 1921 she married Ernest Jamieson, and they had one daughter.

Tips for Inspiring the WI Members in your Group

Photo Courtesy http://londonmasalaandchips.blogspot.ca
Photo Courtesy http://londonmasalaandchips.blogspot.ca

TIPS FOR INSPIRING WI MEMBERS :

• Make it a practice to thank your WI members for their efforts
• Encourage, motivate and show enthusiasm for projects and programs
• Plan some fun programs, share jokes and stories
• Keep things simple – do not deal with too many issues at one time
• Find out the issues that the members are interested in and invite speakers on the topics
• Write a resolution about a “burning” issue
• Brainstorm to come up with new ideas or new ways to present old topics.
• Seek feedback from your members by having comments and questions at the end of your meetings
• Solicit program ideas from the membership
• Make sure no member is carrying more responsibilities than she can handle or desire
• Frequently check with each member so that discontent can be known and changes made
• Use the talents of your members
• If certain practices are no longer working in your group, change the way things are being done
• Be flexible – try different ways of meeting, working and planning

W.I. Our goal is to Inspire Women to make a difference! Let’s have fun and make that happen.

Can you add to the list? Join in, please,  and comment below!