FWIC Blog

Happy Anniversary. And Many More!

President Elect Joan Holthe paid a visit to the 95th Anniversary Tea of the Valhalla Busy Bees WI from Alberta.

I was very pleased to be in attendance and bring greetings on behalf of president Linda, and the other members of the board on the occasion of their 95th year. They had a great display of quilts and report of their many years of community service. I told them they had to keep working so I can present them with their 100 certificate!

IMG_2085
Joan Holthe, FWIC President Elect, Kay Saastad, Valhalla President; Jan Lawrence, Secretary; and Lillian Nordhagen, Grande Prairie Constituency Convener, Eunice Horte, MC.

IMG_2086 IMG_2089

Winner of the Federated Women’s Institutes Quilt Draw

Winner of the Federated Women’s Institutes Quilt draw at the Triennial Conference in Fredericton New Brunswick is Denice Glaze of Fordwich Ontario, pictured here with her husband Joe and children Ashley and Matthew. She is absolutely thrilled as her 2 children greatly resemble the ones in the quilt.

DSCF0358-002 photo 2
Second photo with the quilter, Donna Henderson. Congratulations, Denice!

 

P.E.I. WI recipe for success: Beet Cake

 

After months of work, Helen Dawson, argricultural convener, left, and Miriam Lank, home economics and health convener, and show the results of their project – the Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.
After months of work, Helen Dawson, agricultural convener, left, and Miriam Lank, home economics and health convener, and show the results of their project – the Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.

If you have a surplus of beets in your garden, you might want to consider this prize-winning recipe. It was awarded “Best of” The Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.  Copies are available at the WI office, 40 Enman Cres., Charlottetown, or by calling 902-368-4860.

Winning recipe: Beet Cake from the June 19th article in The Guardian, by Sally Cole.

3 egg yolks
1 ½ cup white sugar
1 cup oil
1 tsp. vanilla
3 tbsp. hot water
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup shredded raw beets
½ cup raisins or nuts
2 cups flour
2 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt

Mix egg yolks, sugar, oil, vanilla and hot water together. Add shredded carrots, shredded beets, raisins, flower, baking powder and salt. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Pour in tube pan. Bake at 350 degrees C for one hour.

Icing

¼ cup margarine
4 oz. cream cheese
1 tsp. vanilla
1 cup icing sugar

Blend together in a bowl.

If you have a super surplus, give this recipe for Chocolate Beet Cupcakes a try, too!

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Making Change Count!

Planting Seeds of Change - Looking Forward
Planting Seeds of Change – Looking Forward

Making Change Count! A letter of introduction from President Linda Hoy. Please share with your membership.

Hello WI,

Welcome to the new Triennium.

The FWIC Convention was a wonderful opportunity for WI to come together to share and plan for the future of this organization. We held a plenary session where we asked for input from all convention attendees on how to ensure the viability of our organization. These key words and phrases were repeated many times:

• Be more visible • Publicize • Promote • Recruit • Reach out

Many of our members at the branch level may not realize how uncertain the future of our organization is. We continue to lose members at a steady rate that even our most successful recruitment strategies at the provincial and national level have not been able to combat. In many branches, WI continues to function as it always has. It is perceived that there is no need to do anything differently or that change will come from above: the provinces or the national level. The truth is, we must all be proactive to revitalize this great organization for women. As a grassroots organization, the power to thrive lies is in the hands of the individual members and the WI branches themselves. The future of WI lies within you and must happen in your community first.

It is imperative that you understand that we need to do things differently. We need to market and promote and be more visible.

Here’s how you can help: if WI is to survive, we need to make ourselves available and open to attracting new members. We need to be visible to gain credibility among other nonprofits and for-profit agencies and funding bodies. This means we must be proud of our organization and promote ourselves.

Get into the habit of alerting the public of upcoming meetings and special WI events by writing press releases and reports before and after your events. Designate someone in your branch as Media Coordinator: it could be considered THE most important role if the WI is to succeed.

In most areas, the local newspapers are eager for content and will print your meeting and event reports in their entirety. Take pictures and include them. Remember to smile!

Once you’ve tackled print media, set your sights on social media. Facebook has been credited over and over for outstanding marketing success. It’s free, it’s fun. It’s folly to ignore it.

Let us all continue to work together, For Home & Country,
Linda Hoy, President
Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Adelaide’s Cookies

By special request! Visitors to the homestead today asked for Addie’s cookie recipe. I am happy to oblige, but must warm you: the recipe does not indicate an oven temperature. Compared to other recipes, I’d say about 350 degrees. But watch the first batch to make sure the oven is not too hot.

Cookies (plain).

1/2 cup butter.
1/4 cup milk.
2 even tsps. baking powder.
1 cup sugar.
1 egg.
Flour to roll out thin. (at least two cups)

Cream the butter, add the sugar, milk, egg beaten lightly, and the baking powder mixed with two cups of flour, then enough more flour to roll out. Roll a little at a time. Cut out. Bake about 10 minutes.

Reprinted with permission from

PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE

BY

MRS. J. HOODLESS,

President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.
This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by
a resolution of the Trustees.
TORONTO:
THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,
1898.
Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, by The Copp, Clark Company, Limited, Toronto, Ontario, in the Office of the Minister of Agriculture.

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Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

HURRAH & HALLELUJAH!

The unveiling of the plaque denoting Margaret “Madge” Watt as a Canadian Woman of Distinction will take place on August 14, 2015.

This award was initially applied for in 2008 – 2009 and we are delighted to see it coming to fruition. Do you want to be there to see it for yourself? Then let us know at your very earliest convenience, so we may arrange for your invitation to be issued.

Who: The Federal Government and the British Columbia Women’s Institute

What: The Ceremony to unveil the Plaque for Mrs. Watt

When: 10:00 am August 14, 2015

Where: Colwood Hall, 2219 Sooke Road in Colwood

Why: To seal Mrs. Watt’s position as a Canadian Woman of Distinction, and one whose efforts have contributed enormously to the betterment no only of early British Columbia, but also many nations throughout the world.

Looking forward to seeing you there!!

Donna Jack, President
South Vancouver Island Women’s Institute
Donna_Jack@telus.net

Ruth Fenner
British Columbia Women’s Institute, Provincial Historian
landrfenner@shaw.ca

Please RSVP your name and complete postal address, or email to Donna Jack or Ruth Fenner by Friday July 10, 2015

WI CENTENARY CAKE

Here is a cake recipe found on the UK Facebook Page – the “Unofficial” site. A social media site very much worth a look if you’d like to watch and learn from over 220,000 inspiring women.

Her Majesty  cuts the cake.
Her Majesty cuts the cake.

WI CENTENARY CAKE

As published in WI Life, Good Food Magazine and WI Cookbook

Ingredients:
225g (8oz) butter, slightly softened
225g (8oz) soft dark brown sugar
4 large free-range eggs
175g (6oz) plain flour55g (2oz) self-raising flour
80g (3oz) ground almonds
80g (3oz) glace cherries, cut into quarters
400g (14oz) currants, small pinhead
170g (6oz) sultanas
55g (2oz) mixed cut peel
½ tbsp marmalade
A wineglass of rum

Method:
1. Line a 20cm square tin with a double layer of non-stick baking parchment
2. Make a collar of folded newspaper for the outside of the tin, plus a thick piece of newspaper for the cake to sit on
3. Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy
4. Beat in the eggs, then stir in the flours and ground almonds
5. Fold in the fruits, followed by the marmalade and the rum. Make sure all ingredients are well mixed
6. Transfer to cake tin and smooth the top
7. Bake the cake at 160°C /fan oven 140°C gas mark 3
8. Turn down the heat after ½ – ¾ hour to 150°C/fan oven 130°C/gas mark 2 and bake until cooked – anywhere between 2-3 ½ hours
9. Use your common sense and turn down the oven as necessary if the cake is getting too brown

Anne Harrison, SWNS WI
Anne Harrison, SWNS WI
Patricia Tulip, one of the cake bakers.
Patricia Tulip, one of the cake bakers.

The cakes’ creation has been a military exercise for retired home economics teachers, Anne Harrison, 72, a dairy farmer’s wife from Wensleydale, North Yorkshire, and Pat Tulip, 75, from Bilton, Northumberland.

They spent 11 full days last month baking 44 12 x 12in cakes 3.5in deep between them. Divided up, this provides enough cake for the 5,000 members.

Miss Tulip said: ‘We’ve been very careful with costing. We used cheap flour and bought eggs in bulk. If we hadn’t had some donations, it would have cost about £1,100.’

The pair followed a recipe chosen following a competition for the WI’s 200,000-plus members won by Julie Clarke, 66, from Coverdale, North Yorkshire, who is chairman of the WI’s North Yorks West Federation.

As you can imagine, an undertaking of this magnitude was not without headaches. You can read more about that here, from the Daily Mail.

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Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Happy 80th Newfoundland and Labrador

In her letter to the members of the Newfoundland and Labrador WI, President Jane Laite writes:

Spring is a special time of year. Many of the memorable activities that we enjoy in the Women’s Institutes occur at this time of year.

Our District AGMs, ACWW Women Walk the World, Earth Day, activities highlighting volunteer activities and the environment, not to mention branch closing activities. This year there is a lot of talk of Conventions, both the FWIC one taking place in Fredericton in June 2015 and the NLWI already taking shape for May 2016 in St. John’s. Connected with the Conventions are the Competitions and the opportunity for NLWI members to display in a tangible way their creative skills.

80th cakeAs you know, 2015 is the 80th anniversary of the NLWI in Newfoundland and Labrador. As part of this recognition, I have asked members to send in their short stories or memories of their time in the Womens Institutes. The submissions don’t have to be long. A paragraph can do. The first eighty submissions will be placed in a booklet and brought to the 2016 Convention. It is entitled 80 Years, 80 stories. I have only received a few so far, but I am sure that there are many more to follow.

I wish the membership an enjoyable summer full of fun, relaxation and exciting activity.

I’ve extracted a couple of items from the newsletter for this blog post, but if you’d like to read more about what’s going on out on the east coast, you can download the newsletter by clicking on this link: Spr 2015 NLWI

all entriesThe newsletter details the Competition Guidelines for the 2016 Provincial Convention. All the usual categories are discussed: needlework, artwork, baking and preserves among them.

 

Speaking of baking, Cherry Bran Bread is one of the several recipes in the newsletter.

Bran_Cherry_Bread

Cherry Bran Bread
INGREDIENTS
2 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 cups milk
1 cup All Bran
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1 egg
3/4 cup sugar
4 tsp baking powder
1/2 lb cherries
1/4 lb walnuts
1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp flavoring

DIRECTIONS
Beat eggs, add milk then add melted butter.
Add the dry ingredients and bake in a moderate oven (350 F) for one hour.

 

New Exhibit at the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead Museum

What a perfect day we had for the new exhibit open house at the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Museum!

Joanna Rickert-Hall, in her new role as Curator of the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead, guided visitors through the new exhibit, “The Empty Crib: Legacy After Loss”.

For the last eight months, Ms. Rickert-Hall has been working at the museum as the Exhibit Developer under the Job Creation Partnership grant from the Ontario government. In that time she has conducted in-depth research, and asked contemporary questions about Adelaide and her legacy. The result is a transformative new look at the driving force behind the establishment of the International Women’s Institute Movement, the National Council of Women of Canada, the VON and the YWCA in Canada.

The Hoodless Homestead season runs from May 3 to Oct 31, 2015.

Please enjoy the images here courtesy our volunteer extraordinaire, Sara Naim!

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.