Addie’s Apples II

About a year ago, I shared a couple of Adelaide Hunter Hoodless’ apple recipes with you. Click on this link if you’d like to re-read that post.

This year, I want to share with you (read: brag about) my recent triumph in the pie-making department. One of the members of the Women Inspiring Women WI is a prize-winning pastry maker. Elaine Tully will hold a couple of workshops later this fall for our WI, but first she wanted to have a technical rehearsal at the church kitchen. There I made my first ever peach pie. OH. EM. GEE. as they say. It was wonderful good!

Just peachy!
Just peachy!

Yesterday, I made an apple pie using Addie’s Apples. Literally. These apples were picked from the trees at the Homestead.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
I don’t know the variety of apple, but the flesh is crisp and tart. It held up well in the baking. I’m going to pick more this week and make applesauce.
Addie's Apples before...
Addie’s Apples before…
... and after.
… and after.

My hubby tried an apple fresh and found them rather tart. When I told him that I had made a pie he asked, “Did you put in lots of sugar?” Of course, I did, we’re talking brown sugar here!

The secret to success? Cold ingredients and limit handling: keys to fantastic pie crust. I used the pie crust recipe on the Crisco box and Edna Staebler’s Double Crust Apple Pie filling, copied here:

  • 3 cups of peeled, cored, and sliced apples (I used 4 cups. Next time I will use more – the crust to fruit ratio can use some tweaking)

Toss the apples in with the following:

  • 2/3 to 1 cup sugar, depending on tartness of apples
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg (I omitted this – too lazy to grate the nutmeg)
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Place in pie shell and dot with

  • 2 or 3 tablespoons of butter
  • 2 tablespoons of milk or cream

Cover with the top crust, flute edges, and slash the top to create vents for steam to escape.

Bake at 375 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes until the crusts are a pale golden colour.

***

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award

The collective impact of our country’s female leaders cannot be understated.

Introducing: The Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award is the premier national award of Women’s Institute celebrating the achievements of the most successful in this inspiring group. This award recognizes a woman for demonstrating excellence—from leadership to social change, from local to global reach, across multiple sectors. We are honored to shine a spotlight on her.

Nominations Now Open
We have a wonderful opportunity to recognize some of the top female leaders in Canada through the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award. These women do not have to be members of Women’s Institute. This Award seeks to acknowledge dedicated women whose contributions make their communities and our world a better place to live.

Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year Award recognizes the hard work, dedication, and support that these women have offered and continue to offer as they give leadership, inspire others, and make a difference while exhibiting the qualities of Adelaide Hunter Hoodless, the founder of the Women’s Institute Organization. Adelaide Hoodless dedicated her life to ensure women had educational opportunities. Adelaide Hoodless was called “one of the most famous Canadian women…yet one of the most obscure.” She is credited as being co-founder of the Women’s Institute, the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), the National Council of Women, the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON), and a major force behind the formation of three faculties of Household Science.

Adelaide Hoodless exemplified women supporting women, through education, encouragement, and social action.

To nominate yourself or a friend, please complete the one page nomination form downloadable from the FWIC website and submit it to fwican@gmail.com.

Nominees will be judged based on the leadership they have exhibited and the ways they have given back to community by mentoring or supporting other women.

Nominations will close at midnight on December 31st each year and winners will be notified in February.

Please contact your WI provincial office or visit our website for the one page application. Please note nominations are open to all living Canadian women who inspire others and work for positive change for their community or country. Applications are due to FWIC by December 31 of each year.

Dr. Ellen McLean being presented with the award in her home by Nova Scotia WI member Eleanor Lilley.
Dr. Ellen McLean being presented with the award in her home by Nova Scotia WI member Eleanor Lilley.

Congratulations to Dr. Ellen McLean of Nova Scotia for being the premiere recipient of The Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Woman of the Year.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Adelaide’s Cookies

By special request! Visitors to the homestead today asked for Addie’s cookie recipe. I am happy to oblige, but must warm you: the recipe does not indicate an oven temperature. Compared to other recipes, I’d say about 350 degrees. But watch the first batch to make sure the oven is not too hot.

Cookies (plain).

1/2 cup butter.
1/4 cup milk.
2 even tsps. baking powder.
1 cup sugar.
1 egg.
Flour to roll out thin. (at least two cups)

Cream the butter, add the sugar, milk, egg beaten lightly, and the baking powder mixed with two cups of flour, then enough more flour to roll out. Roll a little at a time. Cut out. Bake about 10 minutes.

Reprinted with permission from

PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE

BY

MRS. J. HOODLESS,

President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.
This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by
a resolution of the Trustees.
TORONTO:
THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,
1898.
Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, by The Copp, Clark Company, Limited, Toronto, Ontario, in the Office of the Minister of Agriculture.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

New Exhibit at the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead Museum

What a perfect day we had for the new exhibit open house at the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Museum!

Joanna Rickert-Hall, in her new role as Curator of the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead, guided visitors through the new exhibit, “The Empty Crib: Legacy After Loss”.

For the last eight months, Ms. Rickert-Hall has been working at the museum as the Exhibit Developer under the Job Creation Partnership grant from the Ontario government. In that time she has conducted in-depth research, and asked contemporary questions about Adelaide and her legacy. The result is a transformative new look at the driving force behind the establishment of the International Women’s Institute Movement, the National Council of Women of Canada, the VON and the YWCA in Canada.

The Hoodless Homestead season runs from May 3 to Oct 31, 2015.

Please enjoy the images here courtesy our volunteer extraordinaire, Sara Naim!

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Federation Bulletin for March 2015 – Dates and Events to Remember

fwic logo (350x177)

Included in this issue of the Federation Bulletin is the reminder that a number of deadlines are drawing close. We wrote about the Senator Cairine Wilson and  Tweedsmuir Competitions and the Peace Garden Scholarship last year, if you’d like a refresher.

March 2015 Deadlines

Erland Lee is credited with encouraging Adelaide Hunter Hoodless to speak to the wives of the Farmers’ Institute. From this talk, the first WI was formed in 1897 at the Stoney Creek home of Erland and Janet Lee. The homestead is now owned by the Federation of Women’s Institutes of Ontario and serves as a museum and headquarters of the FWIO.

Erland Lee Competition

erland lee

The FWIC Quilt Draw Sales are well under way. The Quilt Draw is traditionally an important fundraiser for FWIC. The last two conventions both sold nearly 1500 tickets each, raising almost $6000 total! Please continue to sell and promote tickets sales within your province.

Donna Henderson Quilt a

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Scrapbook: The Stanstead Journal Thursday November 19, 1959

Lately, since my involvement with FWIC and Addie and the staff at the homestead, I’ve been knee-deep in reading and googling and wall-to-wall history about the WI and Mrs. Hoodless. I kinda wish now that I had studied history formally at school, way back when.

Oh well, no time for “coulda/woulda/shoulda” and no time like the present to start a scrapbook of the bits and pieces I find about my new heroine, Adelaide Hunter Hoodless and anything to do with the WI.

The article linked to the image below describes the purchase of the Hoodless Homestead. I think Ms. Wilson (no relation!) may have taken some poetic licence when she describes Addie’s walk to school:

It was here that Addie Hunter was born and romped about, skipped across the road to the barn, down to the spring in the willows, and walked the mile and a quarter to school.

The closing paragraph is almost prophetic for it ties into the theme Planting Seeds of Change for next year’s Triennial convention in June.

Already many WI members from Canada and other parts of the world have journeyed to the cairn erected by the Brant County Women’s Institutes to commemorate the birthplace. How much more interesting will be the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Museum, where one can imagine she sees the domestic circle where the seeds for the enrichment of rural homes around the world were nurtured – the vision of a woman born in this humble farm home 100 years ago.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Addie’s Pudding Sauces

beeton_xmas_plum_pudding_1890sWhen I was a girl, for Christmas dinner mom served what she called “Plum Pudding“. She purchased it from the grocer. It was such a memorable treat that a few years ago, I thought I’d try to make my own. “No grocery store stuff for this gal!” I said with a sniff.

The outcome was rich and sweet and yummy, but the work involved! That discovery was an epiphany of sorts. Sorry, Mom, I owe you an apology for being a pudding snob.

victorian plum pudding

Mom did make the lemon sauce for the pudding, though. Since then, I’ve learned there are about as many variations of sauce for the Christmas pudding as there are cooks. Our Adelaide Hunter Hoodless offers several recipes in her “Little Red Book.”

PUDDING SAUCES.

Plain Sauce.
1 cup water.
1 tsp. butter.
1/2 ssp. grated nutmeg.
3 tbsps. sugar.
2 tsps. flour or cornstarch.
Melt the butter and flour together, stir in the hot water, add the sugar and flavoring, cook until smooth and clear.

Molasses Sauce.
1/2 cup molasses.
1/2 cup water or 1/2 tbsp. vinegar.
2 (l.) tsps. flour.
1/2 cup sugar.
1 tbsp. lemon juice.
1 tbsp. butter.
1/2 ssp. salt.
Mix the flour and sugar together. Pour the boiling water upon it. Add the molasses and place on the range. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add the other ingredients; boil up once and serve. (Omit lemon if vinegar is used.)

Cream Sauce.
1 egg.
1 tsp. butter.
1 tsp. cornstarch.
1/2 cup powdered sugar.
1 tsp. vanilla.
1 cup boiling milk.
Beat the white of the egg to a stiff froth; then gradually beat into it the powdered sugar and cornstarch. Next add the yolk of the egg and beat well. Pour upon this the cupful of boiling milk and place on the fire. Stir until it boils, then add the butter and vanilla.

Lemon Sauce.
1 tbsp. cornstarch.
1/2 cup sugar.
1 pint boiling water.
1 tbsp. butter.
1 egg.
1 lemon.
Beat the egg, add the cornstarch and sugar, stir them well together; add the boiling water gradually and stir over the fire until thick; add the butter, juice and grated rind of one lemon. Serve hot.

Vanilla Sauce.
1 cup milk.
2 (l.) tbsps. sugar.
2 eggs.
1/2 tsp. vanilla.
Put the milk on to boil, beat the yolks and sugar till very light; add them to the boiling milk; stir over the fire until creamy. Have the whites beaten, pour over them the boiling mixture; beat thoroughly and serve at once.

***

From

PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE BY MRS. J. HOODLESS, [Adelaide Hunter Hoodless]
President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by a resolution of the Trustees. TORONTO:THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,1898.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Women on Banknotes

 

women on banknotes

Click on the image above to access the Change.org petition created by Merna Forster.

Please sign the petition.

You might want to nominate a certain favourite Canadian woman of your own.

We, of course, are happy to see that Addie has been endorsed.

Click on the photo below to add to the discussion, if you like.

addie on banknote

 ***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Addie’s Potato Soup

Winter is upon us. Time for comfort food. This potato soup recipe is from Addie’s cookbook.

Potato Soup

4 potatoes, medium size.
2 tbsps. minced celery.
2 tbsps. of flour.
1/4 tsp. of pepper.
1/2 tsp. minced parsley.
1-1/2 pints of milk.
4 tbsps. minced onions.
1 tsp. of salt.
1 tbsp. of butter.

Pare the potatoes, place on the fire in enough boiling water to cover, and cook for 30 minutes.

Reserve 1/2 cup milk, put the remainder in the double boiler with the onion and celery and place on the fire.

Mix the cold milk with the flour and stir into the boiling milk.

When the potatoes are cooked pour off the water, mash them until fine and light. Gradually beat into them the milk; now add salt, pepper and butter, and rub the soup through a sieve.

Return to the fire and add the minced parsley; simmer for 5 minutes and serve immediately. (The parsley may be omitted and celery salt substituted for the minced celery.)

From
PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE BY MRS. J. HOODLESS, [Adelaide Hunter Hoodless]
President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by a resolution of the Trustees. TORONTO:THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,1898.
creamofpotatosoupmainjpg

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

 

Addie’s Apples

If people would only realize the value of fruit in its natural state, much of the time devoted to the preparation of pies, puddings, etc., would be saved. All uncooked fruit should be thoroughly ripe and served fresh and cold. Sometimes fruit is more easily digested when the woody fibre has been softened by cooking than when in its natural state, therefore a few simple recipes for cooking fruit are given.”

Adelaide Hunter Hoodless, author

applesauce-1-1024x731Applesauce.
Pare, core and quarter 6 or 8 tart apples.

Make a syrup with 1/2 cup of sugar, 1/2 cup of water, and a little grated lemon peel.

When boiling, add the apples and cook carefully till they are just tender, but not broken.

Remove them carefully, boil the syrup down a little and pour it over the apples.

(For serving with roast goose, etc., cook the apples in a little water, mash until smooth, add sugar to taste.)

Coddled Apples.
Pare tart apples of uniform size; remove the cores without breaking the apples.

Stand them in the bottom of a granite kettle, sprinkle thickly with sugar, cover the bottom of the kettle with boiling water, cover closely and allow the apples to steam on the back part of the stove till tender.

Lift carefully without breaking, pour the syrup over them and stand away to cool (delicious served with whipped cream).

 

Reprinted from

PUBLIC SCHOOL

DOMESTIC SCIENCE

BY

MRS. J. HOODLESS,

President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.
This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by
a resolution of the Trustees.

TORONTO:
THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,
1898.

Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, by The Copp, Clark Company, Limited, Toronto, Ontario, in the Office of the Minister of Agriculture.

***   ***   ***

About Addie – Adelaide Hunter Hoodless
Adelaide was born on February 27, 1857 and raised on this isolated farm in Canada West.
Her public life began after she became a wife and mother. It was instigated by a tragic event: her fourth child died of what was then called a ‘stomach complaint’. Seemingly blaming herself for this tragedy, Adelaide’s campaign sought to raise the level of education for girls and to put supports in place for women so that they might safeguard their families.
She is credited as a co-founder of the Women’s Institute, the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), the National Council of Women and the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON), and a major force behind the formation of three faculties of Household Science. She achieved national recognition in her twenty years of public life. She died in 1910, the year Laurier stated, “The twentieth century belongs to Canada.” Her work had ensured that Laurier’s words applied to women and families.