Fundraising with Victorian Flare

Fall is upon us and that means two things for those of us WI gals in Brant County:

  1. The St. George Applefest.
  2. And a return to our regular scheduled WI program.

Festival organizer Jean Tucker wrote in a March 2015 press release, “The 30th anniversary edition of St. George AppleFest was recently selected as one of the Top 100 Festivals & Events in Ontario (out of 2,500 events) by Festivals & Events Ontario (FEO). Nestled centrally to Cambridge, Paris and Brantford, St. George is blessed with apple blossoms in the spring and a fresh crop of apples in the fall. At this time of year our community “comes alive” and hosts a fantastic festival highlighting apples, pies, crafts, artisans, live entertainment, kids’ rides and much more.”

The event is held in and around the center of town adjacent to the gorgeous Sunnyside Mansion presently owned by David Bailey. This year, David has invited Women Inspiring Women WI to host an Open House and Victorian Fair during the St. George Applefest. The public will get a rare opportunity to take in some history in one of Brant County’s most historic homes.

Sunnyside fundraiserSunnyside stands as a memorial to its former owners, Dr. and Mrs. E.E. Kitchen, who contributed much to the life and times of their era and to their community. Dr. Kitchen’s wife, Annie Charlton, was a friend of Mrs. Adelaide Hunter Hoodless, founder of the Women’s Institute. Mrs. Kitchen supported Mrs. Hoodless in her work by holding Women’s Institute meetings at Sunnyside.*

The Sunnyside Mansion was built at 13 Main St. South, St. George in 1888 and is very rarely opened to the public. Events on September 19th will include a partial home tour, Victorian­-style games, music in the parlour room, tea & refreshments and a silent auction. The event will be open to the public, with admission by donation at the door. Proceeds are in support of the Brant Community Foundation’s David Bailey Legacy Fund and Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead, home to the founder of the Women’s Institute. The event holds special significance for Brant County WI members as the very first meeting of the St. George Branch was hosted here in 1903.

The mansion gained recent notoriety as a film set for the popular Canadian detective drama Murdoch Mysteries. Members of the Women Inspiring Women W.I, local historians in period costumes, local dignitaries, and the public will be on hand to celebrate the unique peek back in time.

Apple Blossom Recipe on YouTube - click on through
Apple Blossom Recipe on YouTube – click on through

On the Facebook Event page, organizer Andrea Roddy invites WI members and friends to volunteer for the weekend. Email invitations for volunteer sign-ups have been sent to all WIW WI members. You can also access the sign-up by following these 3 easy steps:

1) Click this link to see our Sign-Up on VolunteerSpot: http://vols.pt/J5F8us
2) Review the options listed and choose the spot(s) you like.
3) Sign up! It’s Easy – you will NOT need to register an account or keep a password on VolunteerSpot.

Note: VolunteerSpot does not share your email address with anyone. If you prefer not to use your email address, please contact Andrea and she can sign you up manually.

Applefest runs Saturday September 19th 10 AM – 6 PM and Sunday September 20th 10 AM – 5 PM.

Sunnyside Open House ­ hosted by the Women Inspiring Women W.I. at 13 Main Street South, St. George, Ontario Saturday, September 19th, 2015 @ 10am ­ 4pm

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

P.E.I. WI recipe for success: Beet Cake

 

After months of work, Helen Dawson, argricultural convener, left, and Miriam Lank, home economics and health convener, and show the results of their project – the Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.
After months of work, Helen Dawson, agricultural convener, left, and Miriam Lank, home economics and health convener, and show the results of their project – the Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.

If you have a surplus of beets in your garden, you might want to consider this prize-winning recipe. It was awarded “Best of” The Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.  Copies are available at the WI office, 40 Enman Cres., Charlottetown, or by calling 902-368-4860.

Winning recipe: Beet Cake from the June 19th article in The Guardian, by Sally Cole.

3 egg yolks
1 ½ cup white sugar
1 cup oil
1 tsp. vanilla
3 tbsp. hot water
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup shredded raw beets
½ cup raisins or nuts
2 cups flour
2 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt

Mix egg yolks, sugar, oil, vanilla and hot water together. Add shredded carrots, shredded beets, raisins, flower, baking powder and salt. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Pour in tube pan. Bake at 350 degrees C for one hour.

Icing

¼ cup margarine
4 oz. cream cheese
1 tsp. vanilla
1 cup icing sugar

Blend together in a bowl.

If you have a super surplus, give this recipe for Chocolate Beet Cupcakes a try, too!

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Adelaide’s Cookies

By special request! Visitors to the homestead today asked for Addie’s cookie recipe. I am happy to oblige, but must warm you: the recipe does not indicate an oven temperature. Compared to other recipes, I’d say about 350 degrees. But watch the first batch to make sure the oven is not too hot.

Cookies (plain).

1/2 cup butter.
1/4 cup milk.
2 even tsps. baking powder.
1 cup sugar.
1 egg.
Flour to roll out thin. (at least two cups)

Cream the butter, add the sugar, milk, egg beaten lightly, and the baking powder mixed with two cups of flour, then enough more flour to roll out. Roll a little at a time. Cut out. Bake about 10 minutes.

Reprinted with permission from

PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE

BY

MRS. J. HOODLESS,

President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.
This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by
a resolution of the Trustees.
TORONTO:
THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,
1898.
Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, by The Copp, Clark Company, Limited, Toronto, Ontario, in the Office of the Minister of Agriculture.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

WI CENTENARY CAKE

Here is a cake recipe found on the UK Facebook Page – the “Unofficial” site. A social media site very much worth a look if you’d like to watch and learn from over 220,000 inspiring women.

Her Majesty  cuts the cake.
Her Majesty cuts the cake.

WI CENTENARY CAKE

As published in WI Life, Good Food Magazine and WI Cookbook

Ingredients:
225g (8oz) butter, slightly softened
225g (8oz) soft dark brown sugar
4 large free-range eggs
175g (6oz) plain flour55g (2oz) self-raising flour
80g (3oz) ground almonds
80g (3oz) glace cherries, cut into quarters
400g (14oz) currants, small pinhead
170g (6oz) sultanas
55g (2oz) mixed cut peel
½ tbsp marmalade
A wineglass of rum

Method:
1. Line a 20cm square tin with a double layer of non-stick baking parchment
2. Make a collar of folded newspaper for the outside of the tin, plus a thick piece of newspaper for the cake to sit on
3. Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy
4. Beat in the eggs, then stir in the flours and ground almonds
5. Fold in the fruits, followed by the marmalade and the rum. Make sure all ingredients are well mixed
6. Transfer to cake tin and smooth the top
7. Bake the cake at 160°C /fan oven 140°C gas mark 3
8. Turn down the heat after ½ – ¾ hour to 150°C/fan oven 130°C/gas mark 2 and bake until cooked – anywhere between 2-3 ½ hours
9. Use your common sense and turn down the oven as necessary if the cake is getting too brown

Anne Harrison, SWNS WI
Anne Harrison, SWNS WI
Patricia Tulip, one of the cake bakers.
Patricia Tulip, one of the cake bakers.

The cakes’ creation has been a military exercise for retired home economics teachers, Anne Harrison, 72, a dairy farmer’s wife from Wensleydale, North Yorkshire, and Pat Tulip, 75, from Bilton, Northumberland.

They spent 11 full days last month baking 44 12 x 12in cakes 3.5in deep between them. Divided up, this provides enough cake for the 5,000 members.

Miss Tulip said: ‘We’ve been very careful with costing. We used cheap flour and bought eggs in bulk. If we hadn’t had some donations, it would have cost about £1,100.’

The pair followed a recipe chosen following a competition for the WI’s 200,000-plus members won by Julie Clarke, 66, from Coverdale, North Yorkshire, who is chairman of the WI’s North Yorks West Federation.

As you can imagine, an undertaking of this magnitude was not without headaches. You can read more about that here, from the Daily Mail.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Happy 80th Newfoundland and Labrador

In her letter to the members of the Newfoundland and Labrador WI, President Jane Laite writes:

Spring is a special time of year. Many of the memorable activities that we enjoy in the Women’s Institutes occur at this time of year.

Our District AGMs, ACWW Women Walk the World, Earth Day, activities highlighting volunteer activities and the environment, not to mention branch closing activities. This year there is a lot of talk of Conventions, both the FWIC one taking place in Fredericton in June 2015 and the NLWI already taking shape for May 2016 in St. John’s. Connected with the Conventions are the Competitions and the opportunity for NLWI members to display in a tangible way their creative skills.

80th cakeAs you know, 2015 is the 80th anniversary of the NLWI in Newfoundland and Labrador. As part of this recognition, I have asked members to send in their short stories or memories of their time in the Womens Institutes. The submissions don’t have to be long. A paragraph can do. The first eighty submissions will be placed in a booklet and brought to the 2016 Convention. It is entitled 80 Years, 80 stories. I have only received a few so far, but I am sure that there are many more to follow.

I wish the membership an enjoyable summer full of fun, relaxation and exciting activity.

I’ve extracted a couple of items from the newsletter for this blog post, but if you’d like to read more about what’s going on out on the east coast, you can download the newsletter by clicking on this link: Spr 2015 NLWI

all entriesThe newsletter details the Competition Guidelines for the 2016 Provincial Convention. All the usual categories are discussed: needlework, artwork, baking and preserves among them.

 

Speaking of baking, Cherry Bran Bread is one of the several recipes in the newsletter.

Bran_Cherry_Bread

Cherry Bran Bread
INGREDIENTS
2 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 cups milk
1 cup All Bran
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1 egg
3/4 cup sugar
4 tsp baking powder
1/2 lb cherries
1/4 lb walnuts
1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp flavoring

DIRECTIONS
Beat eggs, add milk then add melted butter.
Add the dry ingredients and bake in a moderate oven (350 F) for one hour.

 

Spring in Saskatchewan

SWI logoThe Spring 2015 Newsletter of the Saskatchewan WI landed in my inbox last week. Click SWI0415 for a PDF copy.

President Lynn Ballhorn writes:

Greetings Ladies
The sun is out and I think spring has finally arrived. Winter seemed to last forever. I’m on the mend from knee surgery and doing okay.
The executive have been busy getting organized and ready for the Rally-Annual Meeting on May 22. Hope you can attend. It will be held at the Western Development Museum on Highway 16A West, in Yorkton.
The agenda is on the last page of this newsletter. Please call Lynn at 306 782 3570 or e-mail wlballhorn@sasktel.net if you are coming.
The scholarship is available, please e-mail Karen if you need an application form.
We are in need of a Vice President, as my term is up and Marian is moving up to be President.
Hope everyone is in good health and has survived the winter. Looking forward to seeing you at the meeting.
All my best, Lynn

The newsletter is full of information and lots of anecdotes that will bring a smile. Here’s a sample:

Biology exam

A newsletter wouldn’t be complete without a recipe. Here’s this season’s contribution:Cinnamon_Roll_Cake-2

Cinnamon Bun Cake

Base
3 cups flour
¼ tsp. salt
1 cup sugar
4 Tsp. Baking powder
1 ½ C milk.
2 eggs
2 tsp. vanilla
½ C melted butter (I used marge.)

Mix these ingredients all together adding the butter/marg. last.
Pour into a 9 X 13 pan

Topping

1 C softened butter
1 cup Brown sugar
2 Tbsp. flour
1 Tsp. cinnamon

Mix together, drop by spoonful on base as evenly as possible. Swirl into base with a knife (as for a marble cake)

Bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes. Glaze while still warm

Glaze

2 C powdered sugar
5 Tbsp. milk
1 tsp. vanilla

It seems like a lot of work but it really tasted good and my curling friends loved it!

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Take 10 Recipes: Hobo Stew

Ann Mandziuk, FWIC Executive officer, Manitoba writes:

March – we know spring is just around the corner but what can we do about those winter blahs? Challenge yourself to do something different this month. Pick an activity and as a family do it. It could be outdoors, at a community facility or in your own home – just pick something to break up the winter ‘blah’ time. If the weather will co-operate go outdoors and skate, toboggan, walk, or make a snowman. Start a bonfire and cook something outdoors – savour the flavour of the food. What about a games night – no TV/video games, just play board or other games with friends or family. Imagine how some of these ideas can help to grow a healthier you.

WI Recipe: Hobo Stew (Campfire Stew)

  • Ground beef or stew meat cut into small pieces
  • Vegetables of your choosing – corn, green beans, carrots, onions, bell peppers
  • Garlic or onion
  • Butter
  • Salt and pepper, to taste, or other herbs/spices

Preparation
Tear off a piece of heavy aluminum foil large enough to fold into a pocket to put your ingredients into.
Spray the foil with cooking spray. Add meat first, then vegetables. Top with seasonings and then butter. Close foil on all sides, leaving some room for steam to build. Be sure to mark your packet so it doesn’t get mixed up with anyone else’s.
Put packet into the coals. Cooking time depends on how hot your fire is. I recommend checking in about 10 minutes.

Click on the image for the source and more pictures of how to make Hobo Stew
Click on the image for the source and more pictures of how to make Hobo Stew

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Take 10: Jean Paré’s Chocolate Fondue

Yesterday, I posted the highlights from the Saskatchewan WI’s newsletter. In order to keep the length of that post within reason, I decided against including the recipe for Chocolate Fondue. Good thing! Because today’s highlight is the same recipe from British Columbia’s Take 10 Newsletter winging its way toward the members’ email in-boxes.

Chocolate fondue image - click for source.
Chocolate fondue image – click for source.

Chocolate Fondue (Jean Paré)

  • Good quality chocolate bars such as 3 85g Toblerone or 375 ml semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 125 mL cream
  • Orange flavoured liqueur or juice
  • Break chocolate and stir with cream and liqueur/juice over low heat until melted.
  • Transfer to fondue pot.
  • Dip fruit, etc. and enjoy. (Thin with more cream if it thickens)

Dippers: strawberries, raspberries, pears, bananas, grapes, orange sections, apple wedges, pineapple, melon, mini marshmallows, mini cookies, cake or doughnut cubes, etc. Let you imagination run free when thinking of dippers.

FWIC executives

FWIC executive officers enjoyed this recipe at their meeting at the International Peace Garden. What better way to spend a Saturday evening than with chocolate and great women from across Canada!

 ***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Saskatchewan Women’s Institute Newsletter January/February 2015

As usual, I learned something new when I read the latest from the Saskatchewan Women’s Institute Newsletter. Do you know what Clootie is? No, neither did I. Read on to find out! Thanks to Newsletter Editor Karen A. Gerwing for passing along the file. Below are the highlights. If you’d like to read the entire publication, click on the link here:  SWI0115

SWI is having a raffle to raise funds. Prizes are:

  1. Hand made quilt
  2. Table runner
  3. Gift basket.

Tickets will be $2 each or 3 for $5. Drawing at the SWI Annual conference held at the Western Development Museum in Yorkton May 22, 2015.

The newsletter contains several informative articles including a piece by Audrey Helgason. She  wrote about Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) or what is commonly referred to as scab. It is a fungal disease usually affecting crops such as wheat, barley, oats, rye, canary seed and some forage crops. Clara Simpson submitted a recap of her Canadian Industries Report on industrial hemp – the history and present day uses of the plant.

And then, the food!

Marian Ogrodnick submitted the report from the Valley Lillies WI who met for the first time in 2015. At this meeting the women learned about Scottish cooking and customs. The hostess, Christine Akrigg demonstrated several recipes. The one that caught my eye was this one:

Clootie Dumpling

  • 1 lb. flour
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 2 tsps. cream of tartar , or 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1lb. raisins
  • 1/2lb sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 3 tsps. mixed spice
  • 3 Tbsps. black treacle (molasses)
  • a little milk
  • Mix all ingredients and add enough milk to give a fairly stiff dough
  • Scald a pudding cloth, dredge with flour and place in a basin.
  • Spoon in the pudding mix, tie up the cloth leaving room for expansion
  • Place an old saucer in the bottom of a pan of boiling water, lower the pudding in its cloth on to this
  • Boil 3 to 4 hrs.
  • Turn out on to a hot serving dish and dredge with sugar.
  • Any leftover is good with bacon, eggs, etc.

“What is a clootie?” I asked the gals on Facebook. I didn’t have to wait long for an answer. Joanna Rickert-Hall of the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead responded to my query almost instantly.

It’s Scottish. Clootie is a cloth/rag of sorts, often torn into strips and tied to a tree for a sort of wishing tree as in ‘tie a yellow ribbon round the old oak tree…..”. There are even wells for this as water was often considered to be a holy place to go and reach out to a water deity in a prayer-like manner. Clooties can also be tied in larger squares in order to steam a sort of a pudding.

AHA! Bingo!

Dumpling161109B

The clootie wrapped dumpling top and ready to eat above. Click on the bottom image for image source.
The clootie wrapped dumpling top and ready to eat above. Click on the bottom image for image source.

In closing, I’ll share the craft portion of the newsletter. The heart decorations were from a Christmas craft book. The crafty WI member took the idea and used Women’s Institute

colours to construct 4” x 5” hearts made of felt. They are stuffed with fibrefill. They can be used as ornaments, or you can mount your WI pins on them on your dresser.

SK heart pin cushion craft