Closed for the Holiday

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The FWIC Office will be closed from December 19, 2014 until January 5, 2015

But we’ll be poking around on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter

Who knows, maybe even here on the blog!

Have a very Merry Christmas and all the best in 2015!

Christmas Gumdrop Cake
Christmas Gumdrop Cake – click on the image for a recipe from Mae Tunnicliffe, Yorkton, Saskatchewan. Mae got the recipe from her mother – this would be in the 1920’s or thereabout.

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About WI

Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Raisin Pear Bundt Cake

Bosc PearMy husband works with a fellow who brought a bushel of Bosc pears to work. “Help yourself,” he said. “I’ve got plenty more!” It would seem that not too many people in the office care for the fruit, because every night Reiner comes home with a couple/three pears in his briefcase.

I enjoy pears well enough, but they must be exactly ripe. Not too firm, not too ripe. He says I’m fussy.

Hmph.

He also says that the Raisin Pear Bundt Cake that I made today was very good. Which surprised me, because I didn’t think that the cake was sweet enough for his palette, nor moist enough, because I, um, overcooked it a tad. Hence the lack of a cake photo. We managed to devour half the cake with our tea, just now. I’d say we have a winner on our hands!

Here is the modified version of this Rhubarb Blueberry Muffins recipe that you can find on the FWIC Pinterest board. It is a winning recipe, too, if you happen to have fresh or frozen berries on hand.

Raisin Pear Bundt Cake

  • 1/4 cup butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 vanilla full fat yogurt (that’s what’s in the fridge – use lo- or no-fat, or sour cream, if you have it on hand.)
  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • 2 cups fresh ripe pears (about 3 Bosc pears)
  • 1/3 cup raisins

Directions

  • In a small bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy.
  • Beat in egg and sour cream.
  • Combine the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger, and salt and then gradually add to creamed mixture alternately with milk.
  • Fold in the pears and raisins.
  • Fill greased bundt pan
  • Bake at 400° for 35 – 40 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes before removing from pans to wire rack.
  • Serve warm.

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Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Addie’s Pudding Sauces

beeton_xmas_plum_pudding_1890sWhen I was a girl, for Christmas dinner mom served what she called “Plum Pudding“. She purchased it from the grocer. It was such a memorable treat that a few years ago, I thought I’d try to make my own. “No grocery store stuff for this gal!” I said with a sniff.

The outcome was rich and sweet and yummy, but the work involved! That discovery was an epiphany of sorts. Sorry, Mom, I owe you an apology for being a pudding snob.

victorian plum pudding

Mom did make the lemon sauce for the pudding, though. Since then, I’ve learned there are about as many variations of sauce for the Christmas pudding as there are cooks. Our Adelaide Hunter Hoodless offers several recipes in her “Little Red Book.”

PUDDING SAUCES.

Plain Sauce.
1 cup water.
1 tsp. butter.
1/2 ssp. grated nutmeg.
3 tbsps. sugar.
2 tsps. flour or cornstarch.
Melt the butter and flour together, stir in the hot water, add the sugar and flavoring, cook until smooth and clear.

Molasses Sauce.
1/2 cup molasses.
1/2 cup water or 1/2 tbsp. vinegar.
2 (l.) tsps. flour.
1/2 cup sugar.
1 tbsp. lemon juice.
1 tbsp. butter.
1/2 ssp. salt.
Mix the flour and sugar together. Pour the boiling water upon it. Add the molasses and place on the range. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add the other ingredients; boil up once and serve. (Omit lemon if vinegar is used.)

Cream Sauce.
1 egg.
1 tsp. butter.
1 tsp. cornstarch.
1/2 cup powdered sugar.
1 tsp. vanilla.
1 cup boiling milk.
Beat the white of the egg to a stiff froth; then gradually beat into it the powdered sugar and cornstarch. Next add the yolk of the egg and beat well. Pour upon this the cupful of boiling milk and place on the fire. Stir until it boils, then add the butter and vanilla.

Lemon Sauce.
1 tbsp. cornstarch.
1/2 cup sugar.
1 pint boiling water.
1 tbsp. butter.
1 egg.
1 lemon.
Beat the egg, add the cornstarch and sugar, stir them well together; add the boiling water gradually and stir over the fire until thick; add the butter, juice and grated rind of one lemon. Serve hot.

Vanilla Sauce.
1 cup milk.
2 (l.) tbsps. sugar.
2 eggs.
1/2 tsp. vanilla.
Put the milk on to boil, beat the yolks and sugar till very light; add them to the boiling milk; stir over the fire until creamy. Have the whites beaten, pour over them the boiling mixture; beat thoroughly and serve at once.

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From

PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE BY MRS. J. HOODLESS, [Adelaide Hunter Hoodless]
President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by a resolution of the Trustees. TORONTO:THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,1898.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Natalie’s Crustless Cranberry Pie

crustless cranberry pie

It is seasonal, great for Christmas, and the beauty of it is you don’t have to make pie crust which some people hate doing! It is from PEI.

Carol

 This looks oh so good and fewer calories with only one crust.

Marie

This is from Natalie Mawhinney. I tried it yesterday and it was great, especially with ice cream! You should try it with your cranberries! Great with ice cream!

Carol

What’s not to love? Easy, fewer calories, and great with ice cream! (I know, ice cream has calories. I’m going with the good thing and ignoring the rest!)

Natalie’s Crustless Cranberry Pie

Heat oven to 325 and grease pie plate

Add in layers:
2 cups cranberries on the bottom of the pie plate
1/2 cup walnuts (optional)
1/2 cup sugar

Mix together the following:
1 cup flour
1 cup white sugar
1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs, beaten
1 tsp almond extract

Add to the pie plate.

Bake 30-40 minutes.

Notes from the cook: Natalie does not use walnuts. She has also made this using rhubarb. If cranberries are frozen mixture will be very thick.

[Update:  I made this last night. Yummy doesn’t begin to describe it. OK, yes, Yummy describes it, but so does sweetly tart, rich, and delicious. It took about twice as long to bake the dough, however, so be prepared to adjust the timing. I’m having some now. For breakfast.]

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Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Addie’s Potato Soup

Winter is upon us. Time for comfort food. This potato soup recipe is from Addie’s cookbook.

Potato Soup

4 potatoes, medium size.
2 tbsps. minced celery.
2 tbsps. of flour.
1/4 tsp. of pepper.
1/2 tsp. minced parsley.
1-1/2 pints of milk.
4 tbsps. minced onions.
1 tsp. of salt.
1 tbsp. of butter.

Pare the potatoes, place on the fire in enough boiling water to cover, and cook for 30 minutes.

Reserve 1/2 cup milk, put the remainder in the double boiler with the onion and celery and place on the fire.

Mix the cold milk with the flour and stir into the boiling milk.

When the potatoes are cooked pour off the water, mash them until fine and light. Gradually beat into them the milk; now add salt, pepper and butter, and rub the soup through a sieve.

Return to the fire and add the minced parsley; simmer for 5 minutes and serve immediately. (The parsley may be omitted and celery salt substituted for the minced celery.)

From
PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE BY MRS. J. HOODLESS, [Adelaide Hunter Hoodless]
President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by a resolution of the Trustees. TORONTO:THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,1898.
creamofpotatosoupmainjpg

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Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

 

Chocolate Beet Cupcakes

My hubby bought one of those large sacks of beets from the grocers a couple of weeks back.  He boiled up a huge dutch oven-full and then every morning he slices and fries up one or two for breakfast until they’re used up.

One lonely beet remained in the fridge for a couple of days.

I like beets well enough, but … well, there’s a but. I don’t know why, but beets don’t hit my radar when it comes to meal planning. Today,  I decided to change things up. Today, I made chocolate beet cupcakes. Dessert is part of the meal, right?

Silly, of course it is!

I modified this vegan recipe to use what I had in the cupboard. It took only 45 minutes to prepare and bake. Of course, if you don’t have a beet-eating hubby, you’ll have to factor in the additional time to cook the beets. Can’t wait for hubby to boil up another batch. Or two!

Chocolate Beet Cupcakes

Pre-heat oven to 375°F

Prepare muffin tins – makes 1 dozen large or 2 dozen mini-muffins. If you use the silicon trays, you need no liners or oiling.

1 cup milk
1 tsp white vinegar
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
½ cup beet purée
1 cup + 1 heaping Tbsp all-purpose flour
scant 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp baking powder
pinch salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together milk and vinegar and set aside to curdle for a few minutes.
  2. Then add the sugar, oil, vanilla extract, and beets and beat until foamy.
  3. In a medium bowl, mix together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.
  4. Slowly sift the dry ingredients into the beet mix, stirring all the while. Beat until no large lumps remain.
  5. Pour batter into liners, filling 3/4 of the way full.

For large muffins, bake 22 to 25 minutes, mini muffins for 15 to 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
Transfer to a cooling rack and let cool completely before frosting.  Or dust with cocoa powder, if you desire.
Store in an airtight container to keep fresh.

Don’t worry, though. They won’t last.

 

 

muffin pan
I also used those amazing silicon mini-muffin trays. No fuss with paper liners or spray or oil or nuthin’!

 

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Rosemary-Lemon Chicken Skewers

Earlier this month Kate, FWIC’s executive director, hosted a potluck dinner to thank the hard-working volunteers at FWIC and the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead. You may recognize the photo here from Facebook or Twitter. If the smiling faces are any indication, a good time was had by all. Kate said, “We thought the “antlers” would makes us look distinctly “Canadian” for the #IAmWI campaign.” Works for me!

There was plenty of food, as is always the case at a potluck! Special requests went our for Mary Lee’s Rosemary-Lemon Chicken Skewers.

Rosemary-Lemon Chicken Skewers.
Soak small wooden skewers in water for approx 25 mins.
Cut 5 chicken breasts into  1/4″ thick slices
Combine the following
1/2 c olive oil
1 tsp lemon juice
1/2 c ranch dressing
1 tsp white vinegar
3 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp minced fresh rosemary
1/4 tsp pepper
1-2 tsp salt
Put chicken pieces in mixture and cover. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.  Mary Lee put it in the fridge over night.
Skewer the chicken pieces and grill on the BBQ.
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Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.