Stanstead Journal Profile of Linda Hoy, FWIC President

The following article is reprinted with permission by Victoria Vanier of the Stanstead Journal. The original was published in print on August 5th and will be available online at a later date.

Local woman begins FWIC presidency

DSC_0153Earlier this summer, Linda Hoy, of Sand Hill, took over the reins of the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada (FWIC) , the national organization that ‘umbrellas’ the individual Women’s Institutes across the country. Ms. Hoy officially became the president at that organization’s Annual Convention, held in New Brunswick in June.

Asked what her priorities will be as the new president, Linda commented: “We will continue to work on the seeds of change that were planted in the last triennium by “Making Change Count”. That is the theme chosen by my new board at the Post Convention Board meeting.”

“We want to continue the partnership we have with Vesey’s Bulb fundraising program, the International Peace Garden and the Scholarship and a new award called the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Canadian Women of the Year Award. It is the premier national award of Women’s Institute celebrating the achievements of the most successful in this inspiring group. The award recognizes a woman for demonstrating excellence – from leadership to social change, from local to global reach, across multiple sectors. We are honored to shine a spotlight on her.
Plans to celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary are being talked about with a year-long party.”

“The Strategic Plan for the next three years will be for the organization to be more visible by publicizing and promoting our organization in the local newspapers. The Stanstead Journal has always been a support to the WI in the area and we hope that it will continue for many years to come. By promoting and publicizing we are hoping to recruit new members. I have challenged each of our 9,000 members to recruit one new member a year. We have seen a new branch formed in Paris, Ontario, with 45 members. Social media (Facebook) played a big part in getting 100 interested ladies to come to an information night. The Women’s Institute is not just for the rural ladies – there is a need to bring the WI to the urban cities.”

Linda as Willie the Worm
Linda as Willie the Worm

As President, Linda has been invited to visit each province during her term. It could be for an annual convention, Anniversary or special event such as the Board in Quebec in 2017. Linda will be appearing in her Willie the Worm costume as she travels across the country to raise funds for the organization rather than raising the membership fees.

 

“I am proud to represent all Women’s Institute members from my branch here in the Eastern Townships to Quebec and all across Canada – from Coast to Coast to Coast,” concluded Ms. Hoy.

***

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

P.E.I. WI recipe for success: Beet Cake

 

After months of work, Helen Dawson, argricultural convener, left, and Miriam Lank, home economics and health convener, and show the results of their project – the Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.
After months of work, Helen Dawson, agricultural convener, left, and Miriam Lank, home economics and health convener, and show the results of their project – the Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.

If you have a surplus of beets in your garden, you might want to consider this prize-winning recipe. It was awarded “Best of” The Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.  Copies are available at the WI office, 40 Enman Cres., Charlottetown, or by calling 902-368-4860.

Winning recipe: Beet Cake from the June 19th article in The Guardian, by Sally Cole.

3 egg yolks
1 ½ cup white sugar
1 cup oil
1 tsp. vanilla
3 tbsp. hot water
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup shredded raw beets
½ cup raisins or nuts
2 cups flour
2 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt

Mix egg yolks, sugar, oil, vanilla and hot water together. Add shredded carrots, shredded beets, raisins, flower, baking powder and salt. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Pour in tube pan. Bake at 350 degrees C for one hour.

Icing

¼ cup margarine
4 oz. cream cheese
1 tsp. vanilla
1 cup icing sugar

Blend together in a bowl.

If you have a super surplus, give this recipe for Chocolate Beet Cupcakes a try, too!

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Spring in Saskatchewan

SWI logoThe Spring 2015 Newsletter of the Saskatchewan WI landed in my inbox last week. Click SWI0415 for a PDF copy.

President Lynn Ballhorn writes:

Greetings Ladies
The sun is out and I think spring has finally arrived. Winter seemed to last forever. I’m on the mend from knee surgery and doing okay.
The executive have been busy getting organized and ready for the Rally-Annual Meeting on May 22. Hope you can attend. It will be held at the Western Development Museum on Highway 16A West, in Yorkton.
The agenda is on the last page of this newsletter. Please call Lynn at 306 782 3570 or e-mail wlballhorn@sasktel.net if you are coming.
The scholarship is available, please e-mail Karen if you need an application form.
We are in need of a Vice President, as my term is up and Marian is moving up to be President.
Hope everyone is in good health and has survived the winter. Looking forward to seeing you at the meeting.
All my best, Lynn

The newsletter is full of information and lots of anecdotes that will bring a smile. Here’s a sample:

Biology exam

A newsletter wouldn’t be complete without a recipe. Here’s this season’s contribution:Cinnamon_Roll_Cake-2

Cinnamon Bun Cake

Base
3 cups flour
¼ tsp. salt
1 cup sugar
4 Tsp. Baking powder
1 ½ C milk.
2 eggs
2 tsp. vanilla
½ C melted butter (I used marge.)

Mix these ingredients all together adding the butter/marg. last.
Pour into a 9 X 13 pan

Topping

1 C softened butter
1 cup Brown sugar
2 Tbsp. flour
1 Tsp. cinnamon

Mix together, drop by spoonful on base as evenly as possible. Swirl into base with a knife (as for a marble cake)

Bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes. Glaze while still warm

Glaze

2 C powdered sugar
5 Tbsp. milk
1 tsp. vanilla

It seems like a lot of work but it really tasted good and my curling friends loved it!

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Fashion Accessories: New Branch March 28 Fundraiser

My Sister's Closet

ANNOUNCEMENTS!

All Women Welcome!
Learn about the New Brant WI.

PLEASE SHARE THE NEWS WITH YOUR FRIENDS!

Plan to attend an accessory swap March 28 at the T.B. Costain Community Center in Brantford. The new branch of the Women’s Institute is holding a fundraising event in collaboration with and support of Nova Vita.

Come shop for gently used purses, sunglasses, scarves, jewelry etc. Invite Mom, Grandma, Sis, and the kids! Please pass this information along to anyone in your network.

If you are interested in helping that day, please let us know.

Contact Dana Gignac for more information.

Bring donation articles with you on the 28th or drop them off before to:

37 Jane Street Paris, ON
8am to 7pm; (519)442-0887

9 Sunset Ave, Brantford, ON
(519)-209-4758

Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead, St. George
9am to 4pm Mon. to Thur. (519)-448-3873

For more info please contact Dana Gignac
Phone: (519)-209-4758

 

Try this on – See if it Fits

Hey Women Inspired! We are less than two months away! Then we’re officially official with a name and mission and a plan!

The turnout at our information session February 12 was beyond our expectations. In the meantime, we continue to promote the Women’s Institute on our Facebook Group Page and plan for the March 28 fundraising event to be held in collaboration with Nova Vita.

As of today’s count, about 45 women will attend the March 12 meeting. Number one on the agenda is choosing our name. Then we can finally move forward on paperwork that’s been stacking up. Things like bank accounts and web sites and tattoos* and stuff.

We also want to get a head start on our program for the year. We will brainstorm the charities or causes we will support, speakers, outings, festivities, and fundraising events.

We also want to discuss the roles of branch officers and committee chairs. Traditionally, branch responsibilities have been shared among the executive officers. You know, President and Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer and so on. While most branches still choose to be organized this way, it is not mandatory. Branches who wish to share responsibilities among the members must designate someone as Contact person and another as Treasurer.

Once the branch is formed in April we will hold elections. Check out the following positions. Perhaps there is something here you’d like to try on for size.

PresidentPresident 

The Leader of the branch. She runs the meetings and  is hostess of the evening – greets the guests and speakers and new members. The President keeps tabs on projects,  committees and sub groups that form, and basically oversees the branch. If there is enough interest in this position, the role of Vice President can be filled. This gal will fill in for the President when she is unable to attend meetings.

SecretarySecretary

The Secretary prepares the agenda, takes minutes of the meetings and prepares and delivers the written minutes to the members. She passes along any news from the Federation of Women’s Institutes of Ontario (FWIO). She is the primary contact between the branch and the provincial and federal offices. If there is more than one person interested in this role? Yup, you guessed it. A Vice Secretary is elected.

Speaking of minutes: many of our membership are online. But there are few who are not, and it is important that we find a way to keep these gals in the loop. We will set up a buddy system to pair up those with internet with those without.

treasurerTreasurer

This gal is responsible for the finances of the branch. She collects dues, pays the speakers and other service providers, keeps the books and prepares them for audit and presentation at the annual meeting.

Committee 1Advocacy Coordinator

The Advocacy Coordinator is the spokesperson for the branch regarding resolutions. Some of the duties may include: preparing resolutions, acting on local issues and concerns, and working with the Provincial Advocacy Coordinator.

Here is a snippet from the FWIO website.

Women’s Institute Members have been instrumental in establishing new laws and amending existing ones. Our Members voice their concerns and initiate resolutions at the community, provincial, national and international levels.

Historically, FWIO has played a pivotal role in influencing many changes to provincial laws and practices, including:

  • Mandatory stopping for school buses with flashing lights
  • Installation of railway crossing signs
  • Painting of white lines on provincial highways
  • Implementation of easy-to-understand food labels
  • Enforcement of proper use of slow-moving vehicle signs
  • Clear markings on poison containers

Committee 2Membership Coordinator

Some of the duties in this position may include outreach to promote WI at colleges or universities, for example ; speaking engagements or letter writing to attract new members; mentoring new members who join.

Committee 4Public Relations Coordinator 

This gal gets the word out. She writes our media releases to alert the press about our meetings, special events, and otherwise keeps our name in the spotlight. Social media and other writing projects like a blog or website are handled by this position.

ROSE Coordinator

Simply put, ROSE (Rural Ontario Sharing Education) is what Women’s Institutes have been doing for over 118 years – providing education to help build stronger families and vibrant communities.  This unique province-wide initiative is driven by WI Members who often work with local community organizations and businesses to increase awareness, provide support and promote community action.

The ROSE Coordinator promotes education to the branch and community. As long as one person from the public who is not a WI member attends the event, it qualifies as a ROSE program. Some of the duties may include: developing educational programs and activities for the community and promoting and organizing ROSE Sessions. You can read more about ROSE on the FWIO Website.

Tweedsmuir Coordinator

This position will appeal to the historian and the record keeper. She compiles and coordinates Tweedsmuir History Books. Some of the duties may include: writing and editing material and planning and exhibiting the Tweedsmuir Books.

Baroness Tweedsmuir
Susan Buchan, Baroness Tweedsmuir (née Susan Charlotte Grosvenor) (1882–1977) was the wife of author John Buchan. Between 1935 and 1940 she was viceregal consort of Canada while her husband was the Governor General. She was also the author of several novels, children’s books, and biographies, some of which were published under the name Susan Tweedsmuir.

Who or what is a Tweedsmuir? Here’s how the County of Elgin Women’s Institutes explain it:

west lorne TweedsmuirIn the mid 1930s Lady Tweedsmuir, wife of the Governor General began encouraging Women’s Institute branches to preserve the history of their communities in response to what she saw as a rapidly changing and urbanizing landscape. By 1947, local branches across the province were compiling living “scrapbooks” which came to be known as Tweedsmuir Histories. In many ways, the members of the Women’s Institutes were the unofficial archivists of their communities. They acquired records, oral histories, photographs and much more for inclusion in their volumes, leaving us today with an outstanding resource on the history of rural Ontario.  Click on the blue book cover right for a sample of a Tweedsmuir.

The roles listed above are the positions recommended and described on the FWIO website. We expect that we will also need the following positions filled:

  • Program Coordinator plans the content or topic for each meeting. This gal and her team will need to work hand-in-hand with the
  • Event Coordinator/Committee who plan special occasions like summer picnics or fundraising or Champagne Breakfast Celebrations (hint, hint). Both these committees will need to work closely with the
  • Volunteer Coordinator who will organize the helping hands for meetings or events for things like arranging for tea and cookies, organizing cleanup afterward, or finding someone with power tools and the skills to use them.

What do you think? Is there something here that suits you? Drop us a line if you have any more questions or suggestions.

Paris WI

* just kidding**

** then again…

This tattoo adorns the body of the President of the Cambridge Blue Belles WI, UK
This tattoo adorns the body of the President of the Cambridge Blue Belles WI, UK. Click on the image for the blog post.

Saskatchewan Women’s Institute Newsletter January/February 2015

As usual, I learned something new when I read the latest from the Saskatchewan Women’s Institute Newsletter. Do you know what Clootie is? No, neither did I. Read on to find out! Thanks to Newsletter Editor Karen A. Gerwing for passing along the file. Below are the highlights. If you’d like to read the entire publication, click on the link here:  SWI0115

SWI is having a raffle to raise funds. Prizes are:

  1. Hand made quilt
  2. Table runner
  3. Gift basket.

Tickets will be $2 each or 3 for $5. Drawing at the SWI Annual conference held at the Western Development Museum in Yorkton May 22, 2015.

The newsletter contains several informative articles including a piece by Audrey Helgason. She  wrote about Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) or what is commonly referred to as scab. It is a fungal disease usually affecting crops such as wheat, barley, oats, rye, canary seed and some forage crops. Clara Simpson submitted a recap of her Canadian Industries Report on industrial hemp – the history and present day uses of the plant.

And then, the food!

Marian Ogrodnick submitted the report from the Valley Lillies WI who met for the first time in 2015. At this meeting the women learned about Scottish cooking and customs. The hostess, Christine Akrigg demonstrated several recipes. The one that caught my eye was this one:

Clootie Dumpling

  • 1 lb. flour
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 2 tsps. cream of tartar , or 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1lb. raisins
  • 1/2lb sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 3 tsps. mixed spice
  • 3 Tbsps. black treacle (molasses)
  • a little milk
  • Mix all ingredients and add enough milk to give a fairly stiff dough
  • Scald a pudding cloth, dredge with flour and place in a basin.
  • Spoon in the pudding mix, tie up the cloth leaving room for expansion
  • Place an old saucer in the bottom of a pan of boiling water, lower the pudding in its cloth on to this
  • Boil 3 to 4 hrs.
  • Turn out on to a hot serving dish and dredge with sugar.
  • Any leftover is good with bacon, eggs, etc.

“What is a clootie?” I asked the gals on Facebook. I didn’t have to wait long for an answer. Joanna Rickert-Hall of the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead responded to my query almost instantly.

It’s Scottish. Clootie is a cloth/rag of sorts, often torn into strips and tied to a tree for a sort of wishing tree as in ‘tie a yellow ribbon round the old oak tree…..”. There are even wells for this as water was often considered to be a holy place to go and reach out to a water deity in a prayer-like manner. Clooties can also be tied in larger squares in order to steam a sort of a pudding.

AHA! Bingo!

Dumpling161109B

The clootie wrapped dumpling top and ready to eat above. Click on the bottom image for image source.
The clootie wrapped dumpling top and ready to eat above. Click on the bottom image for image source.

In closing, I’ll share the craft portion of the newsletter. The heart decorations were from a Christmas craft book. The crafty WI member took the idea and used Women’s Institute

colours to construct 4” x 5” hearts made of felt. They are stuffed with fibrefill. They can be used as ornaments, or you can mount your WI pins on them on your dresser.

SK heart pin cushion craft

 

 

 

The Good Ol’ Days

GH Iron Dec 1916

Indulge me please, in a wee rant. Look at this advertisement from December 1916.

Just look at it!

There are so many things wrong with this, I don’t know where to begin.

A picture is worth a thousand words. Which is good, because I’m speechless.

OK, not speechless any more:

That contraption? It’s an IRON!?

What were they thinking when they built that bad boy?

Here’s what:

This, Dear, Is the Gift I Knew Would Please You Most

Really.

YOUR husband would choose this Gift, too, if he but knew how much it meant to you, to your health, your youthfulness, your comfort. A little hint, such as you use when you really set your heart on having something, will let “him” know that a “Simplex” would prove the most acceptable Gift this year.

[stifling gag reflex]

“him” Why the quotes?  I don’t get it. Is the guy in the picture not her husband, but her “him”? Either way, I have lost all respect for “her”.

30 Days’ Free Trial–Small Payment Down

I’ll just bet they wanted a small payment down.  Grab the money and run fellas!

Just what every Housewife needs and wants, because it banishes the ironing drudgery forever; eliminates the headaches, backaches. And keeps her supplied with an abundance of fresh, beautifully-ironed linen all the time without labor.

LIES! “Without labor”, my Aunt Fanny!

Two cents for heat, using gas or gasoline, and even less when a motor is used to turn it, is the total expense of an average ironing. In one hour the “Simplex” finishes an ironing which requires four to five hours by hand; gives a better finish and is easy and safe to use.

But wait! There’s more! It’s gas operated! Guess she’ll be ironing out doors!  Or not, if she elects to turn the thing by hand.  Oh, that’s right. My mistake: it’s “without labor.”  I’m going to ignore the fact that without this unit it takes her four to five hours to complete the ironing. Otherwise my head will explode.

Write today for our handsomely illustrated book on ironing. The “Simplex” is sold by all dealers handling the better Grade of family washing machines. The Gift that Gladdens 52 Times a Year.

Gotta give ’em props for precision: “The Gift that Gladdens 52 times a Year. Not 51, not 53, but exactly 52.

I’m off to Google “the better grade of family washing machines.  If you don’t hear from me, just grab a mop and clean up the puddle that will be what remains of my, um, remains.

If you liked this bit of surrealism, (and that’s what I’m calling it because it kills me to think that this is a bona fide ad) you might like to read about my early introduction to the sublime task of ironing.  

The FWIC News for November 2014

About The FWIC News. 

Our Social Media Coordinator is keeping an eye out for internet news items that feature WI’s across Canada. As the articles are published in online newspapers, we will share the links via Facebook and Twitter. Once a month we will send out a compilation of the news stories. The journalist’s name as well as links to the original website are at the end of each article. An abbreviated version of the compilation will be posted here, which in turn will be posted on Facebook and Twitter. 

If you have any comments or questions, or any news stories that we’ve missed, please let us know!

wi_FWIClogo

NFLD Coaker Foundation launches inter-generational learning program 

The Sir William Ford Coaker Heritage Foundation is launching a learning program for all ages, thanks to a grant from Eastern Health.

Officials from Eastern Health were in Port Union last week to officially announce the $10,000 in funding. It’s the largest grant the corporation has handed out this year from its community development fund.

Edit Samson of the Coaker Foundation said the inter-generational learning program will focus on exchange of knowledge between young and old, as well as storytelling.

The Women’s Institute is also helping with providing the craft meetings and storytelling sessions.

Click here to read more of this story by Jonathan Parsons.

***

Nova Scotia: Kings West District Women’s Institute holds fall rally

Cathy Kinsman, president of the Kings West District Women’s Institute, opened the meeting at the Lakeville community hall. The Mary Stewart Collect and Flag Salute were recited. Keshia Timmins, secretary, read the minutes of April 23, 2014 and Esther Chute gave the treasurer’s report.

Special guests for the evening were Jacqueline Melvin, Kings East District director; Heather Davidson, Kings East District president; Liz Johnston, vice-president, Kings East District.

Marge Kinsman
Clarice Pottie, Kings West District Director, recognized Marge Kinsman, Lakeville Women’s Institute member, with a certificate to mark her 90th birthday.

You can read the full report by Joanne Hill, South Berwick WI here.

***

From Prince Edward County WI, Ontario…

Click on the image for the  source.
Click on the image for the source.

…and from British Columbia

Members of the Koksilah Women’s Institute during the 1960s. This photo was possibly taken at the ploughing matches. Left to right, tentatively identified: Edith Vaux, Janie Evans (James), Miss Reid, Mrs.William Chester.— Image Credit: Courtesy Cowichan Valley Women's Institute
Members of the Koksilah Women’s Institute during the 1960s. This photo was possibly taken at the ploughing matches. Left to right, tentatively identified: Edith Vaux, Janie Evans (James), Miss Reid, Mrs.William Chester.— Image Credit: Courtesy Cowichan Valley Women’s Institute

Home Sweet Home Kelvin Grove

Grace Jenkins has lived in Kelvin Grove all her life but one day realized her community had changed without her noticing.

“People were less involved with each other. I drove by houses every day; once I knew who lived there, and I didn’t anymore,” she described her revelation.

Jenkins decided to reverse her indifference and ensure the community would be recognized for its past, present and future through a community history book.

She had become active with the Kelvin Grove Women’s Institute, and felt the project right for their realm, especially as a celebration of the 2014 anniversary of the Confederation Conference.

“They are a group that works for community. That’s why they exist, to help their community be the best it can be,” she explained.

The Women’s Institute agreed, and created a volunteer committee to work on the project. Jenkins started with notes her late mother, Mary Picketts, had compiled earlier for a similar idea, and used her own graphic arts experience to edit the information that would become “Home Sweet Home Kelvin Grove: History of our community through its architectural heritage to 2014.”

Kelvin Grove WIFor more about this story by Michael Parsons, click here.

wi_FWIClogo

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

The FWIC News for October 2014

About The FWIC News. 

Our Social Media Coordinator is keeping an eye out for internet news items that feature WI’s across Canada. As the articles are published in online newspapers, we will share the links via Facebook and Twitter. Once a month we will send out a compilation of the news stories. The journalist’s name as well as links to the original website are at the end of each article. An abbreviated version of the compilation will be posted here, which in turn will be posted on Facebook and Twitter. 

If you have any comments or questions, or any news stories that we’ve missed, please let us know!

wi_FWIClogoOliver Women’s Institute not just a tea party

This week’s article will not preface with a local event that hundreds attended. It will address a local organization that has worked tirelessly as part of the local fabric of our community and, much like many of our service organizations, is in great danger of becoming obsolete unless younger citizens come forward to continue the work it has provided for almost a century in the South Okanagan, BC.

The Oliver Women’s Institute celebrated its 90th birthday last year with a community picnic and spent time reminiscing back in 1922 when the area was opened up for agriculture for veterans of the First World War and other people hoping to find a better life for their families.

Helen Overnes, longtime president of the Women’s Institute, said that the group, exclusively women, would meet once a month to discuss concerns and issues about the community and what they could do about it.

Oliver WI

 

To read more of this article written by Marji Basso as a special to the Chronicle, click on the image above.

Memory set in stone; Cenotaph unveiled in Wainfleet, Ontario

About a year and a half ago the Wainfleet Women’s Institute sent a delegation to council to yet again push for a cenotaph. Council referred the request to the Wainfleet Historical Society, a committee was formed and fundraising got under way.

Trivia nights, walkathons, pledge drives, business and community donations poured in for the $60,000 monument. Construction began in May.

“This is a momentous part of our history,” said Cummings, who was joined in making remarks by MP Malcom Allen, MPP Cindy Forster and Mayor April Jeffs before a traditional ceremony of remembrance featuring a moment of silence and laying of wreaths.

WAI_ceno_2_SH___Content

To read more of this article written by Steve Henschel, Port Colborne Leader clcik on the image above.

London ON Area Women’s Institute begins next century

In 1914, Canada was at war and London Area Women’s Institute held their first convention.

In the minutes it was recorded that all branches were very busy knitting for the Red Cross war effort, they were encouraging everyone to “buy goods made in Canada”, sponsored prizes at the local fairs to encourage children to stay in agriculture and gave their boys to their country.

In 2014, London Area Women’s Institute held its 100th annual convention Oct. 9 at the Southwold Keystone Complex, Shedden, Ontario. Elgin District hosted the event and chose the theme “Back 2 Basics”.

London Area WI
Ready to start the next 100 years of London Area Women Institute are the new executive w ho were installed at the 100th annual convention held in Shedden Oct. 9. In the back row are Tweedsmuir History Helen White (Denfield), Provincial Bd. Director and R.O.S.E/Education Rie Van Steeg (Strathroy), Treasurer Sharon Smith (Embro), Children’s Hospital Rep. Berniece Harris (Denfield), P.R.O. Edythe Petrie (St. Marys), Area Voting Delegate Glenna Ladell (Ilderton) and Assistant R.O.S.E./Education Eleanor Williams (St. Marys). In the front row are Tweedsmuir History -Marlyn Brady (Arva), Secretary Ilene Chesterman, Past President Shelia Greason (St. Marys), President Margaret Ogar (London) and Assistant Secretary Marion Urquhart (St. Marys)

To read more of this story by Laura Green, click on the image above.

Women’s Institute Annual Christmas Craft Sale

The Blackville Women’s Institute, New Brunswick, will host their annual Christmas Craft and Bake Sale on Saturday, November 8 from 10:00am to 2:00pm at the Blackville Community Centre, located at 12 South Bartholomew Road.

As in previous years, hot dogs, pop, tea, coffee and doughnuts will be available for purchase in their “lunch room”.

Local vendors will be selling everything from handmade knitted goods and homemade candles to children’s books, baked goods and Christmas wreaths and crafts.

This event is a great opportunity for crafters to showcase their products and allows patrons to get a head-start on their Christmas shopping!

Blackville craftsale

Click on the image above to see the online version of this story. Click here to view photos from last year’s sale.

Provincial honour for Chesley resident

She may be small in stature but she has the heart of a small town hero.

That’s how Linda Murray described 85-year-old Mae Smith of Chesley, one of only 20 people in the province of Ontario to receive the 2014 Senior Achievement Award in a special ceremony at Queen’s Park. [Mae is secretary for the Louise Women’s Institute, in Ontario.]

The award is presented in recognition of significant contributions to your community after the age of 65.

“Most people slow down in later years but not Mae,” Murray wrote in her nomination letter. “She just keeps going and going, quietly working at her various volunteer positions.”

Mae  Smith Chesley

To read more of Mary Golem’s article, click on the image above.

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.