New Exhibit at the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead Museum

What a perfect day we had for the new exhibit open house at the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Museum!

Joanna Rickert-Hall, in her new role as Curator of the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead, guided visitors through the new exhibit, “The Empty Crib: Legacy After Loss”.

For the last eight months, Ms. Rickert-Hall has been working at the museum as the Exhibit Developer under the Job Creation Partnership grant from the Ontario government. In that time she has conducted in-depth research, and asked contemporary questions about Adelaide and her legacy. The result is a transformative new look at the driving force behind the establishment of the International Women’s Institute Movement, the National Council of Women of Canada, the VON and the YWCA in Canada.

The Hoodless Homestead season runs from May 3 to Oct 31, 2015.

Please enjoy the images here courtesy our volunteer extraordinaire, Sara Naim!

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Fashion Accessories: New Branch March 28 Fundraiser

My Sister's Closet

ANNOUNCEMENTS!

All Women Welcome!
Learn about the New Brant WI.

PLEASE SHARE THE NEWS WITH YOUR FRIENDS!

Plan to attend an accessory swap March 28 at the T.B. Costain Community Center in Brantford. The new branch of the Women’s Institute is holding a fundraising event in collaboration with and support of Nova Vita.

Come shop for gently used purses, sunglasses, scarves, jewelry etc. Invite Mom, Grandma, Sis, and the kids! Please pass this information along to anyone in your network.

If you are interested in helping that day, please let us know.

Contact Dana Gignac for more information.

Bring donation articles with you on the 28th or drop them off before to:

37 Jane Street Paris, ON
8am to 7pm; (519)442-0887

9 Sunset Ave, Brantford, ON
(519)-209-4758

Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead, St. George
9am to 4pm Mon. to Thur. (519)-448-3873

For more info please contact Dana Gignac
Phone: (519)-209-4758

 

Take 10 Recipes: Hobo Stew

Ann Mandziuk, FWIC Executive officer, Manitoba writes:

March – we know spring is just around the corner but what can we do about those winter blahs? Challenge yourself to do something different this month. Pick an activity and as a family do it. It could be outdoors, at a community facility or in your own home – just pick something to break up the winter ‘blah’ time. If the weather will co-operate go outdoors and skate, toboggan, walk, or make a snowman. Start a bonfire and cook something outdoors – savour the flavour of the food. What about a games night – no TV/video games, just play board or other games with friends or family. Imagine how some of these ideas can help to grow a healthier you.

WI Recipe: Hobo Stew (Campfire Stew)

  • Ground beef or stew meat cut into small pieces
  • Vegetables of your choosing – corn, green beans, carrots, onions, bell peppers
  • Garlic or onion
  • Butter
  • Salt and pepper, to taste, or other herbs/spices

Preparation
Tear off a piece of heavy aluminum foil large enough to fold into a pocket to put your ingredients into.
Spray the foil with cooking spray. Add meat first, then vegetables. Top with seasonings and then butter. Close foil on all sides, leaving some room for steam to build. Be sure to mark your packet so it doesn’t get mixed up with anyone else’s.
Put packet into the coals. Cooking time depends on how hot your fire is. I recommend checking in about 10 minutes.

Click on the image for the source and more pictures of how to make Hobo Stew
Click on the image for the source and more pictures of how to make Hobo Stew

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Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Federation Bulletin for March 2015 – Dates and Events to Remember

fwic logo (350x177)

Included in this issue of the Federation Bulletin is the reminder that a number of deadlines are drawing close. We wrote about the Senator Cairine Wilson and  Tweedsmuir Competitions and the Peace Garden Scholarship last year, if you’d like a refresher.

March 2015 Deadlines

Erland Lee is credited with encouraging Adelaide Hunter Hoodless to speak to the wives of the Farmers’ Institute. From this talk, the first WI was formed in 1897 at the Stoney Creek home of Erland and Janet Lee. The homestead is now owned by the Federation of Women’s Institutes of Ontario and serves as a museum and headquarters of the FWIO.

Erland Lee Competition

erland lee

The FWIC Quilt Draw Sales are well under way. The Quilt Draw is traditionally an important fundraiser for FWIC. The last two conventions both sold nearly 1500 tickets each, raising almost $6000 total! Please continue to sell and promote tickets sales within your province.

Donna Henderson Quilt a

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Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Membership Monday – Today from BC

Today for Membership Monday, I shall provide some highlights from British Columbia WI’s newsletter Vol 153. It is the February/March 2015 issue and for the full report click on the link here:

BCWI 2015 FEB MAR ISSUE

If you are like me, you will find the next bit of news very uplifting. Here is a screen capture of the newsletter:

Did you see that number? 47?

4.

7.

47.

AWESOME!

OK, on to the reports from the assorted branches:

Nicola Valley WI

This paragraph caught my attention:

With the dumping of Biosolids in our area from the Lower Mainland our members plan to protest as individuals as well as preparing a resolution to send to the Provincial WI.

Biosolids? Help? Google?

Biosolids are the treated, stabilized solids resulting from wastewater treatment and are regulated under the BC Environmental Management Act and Health Act.

Stay tuned for more from Nicola Valley WI for updates on this issue.

From the Douglas District, Pemberton WI look forward to WI Week in February when they hold a potluck and annual “fun auction”. Pictured below are the members and some 64 dozen Christmas Cookies.

Fran Cuthbert, Carmen Levefre-Moore, Barb Brooks, Ola & Donna Perkins, Rolande Midgley, Pat Bencharski, Linda Welsh, Rosalinde Young, Shirley Ellingson, Marnie Simons & hostess Judith Walton.
Fran Cuthbert, Carmen Levefre-Moore, Barb Brooks, Ola
& Donna Perkins, Rolande Midgley, Pat Bencharski,
Linda Welsh, Rosalinde Young, Shirley Ellingson,
Marnie Simons & hostess Judith Walton.

Atchelitz WI celebrated their 100th Anniversary on September 6th.  Because of the continued support of the community at fundraising events, they were once again able to donate to many local charities such as The Ride to Conquer Cancer, Salvation Army Food Bank, Chilliwack Hospice Society, BC Agriculture in the Classroom, Pacific Riding for Developing Abilities, Ann Davis Transition House & Sardis Doorway, just to name a few.

Over in Kamloops District, Overlander WI continued their support of local charities. For example, they gave p.j.’s and toiletries to the YWCA Women’s Shelter. Coldstream WI from the North Okanagan Sushwap District declare themselves to be a “crafty bunch.”  I’d say they are a compassionate bunch too. They gathered “gifts of hope” for the clients of the Canadian Mental Health Association.

Among several community support activities, Gabriola WI from the north end of Vancouver Island made donations to their local 4H club. At the south end of the island, Colwood WI had a busy year. They were fortunate to be involved in several community events last Fall. For example, the women provided Christmas gifts for the residents of Cockerel House. This is a home for injured Veterans and Colwood WI is proud to able to support the vets in their recovery.

Donna Andrew reports that a wonderful time was had by all at the Olympic View Golf Course where they celebrated Christmas. Unfortunately there are no photos. Apparently, says Donna, “what goes on at the golf course stays at the golf course.”

Claude of Cockerel House receives the Christmas gifts from Carol.
Claude of Cockerel House receives the Christmas gifts from Carol.

Langford WI’s report was a series of images. I’ve arranged them in a gallery here. Hover or click for captions.

Salt Spring Island WI pose the question, “Did you know that it was Spanish women who started the chocolate craze?” To that I answer, “No, I did not, but let me go on record to state, GRACIAS!!” Their report also includes this encouraging financial news: “We were able to more than cover our goal of $6,000.00 for donations, our two scholarships and still have money to start the year 2015.”

Take 10: Jean Paré’s Chocolate Fondue

Yesterday, I posted the highlights from the Saskatchewan WI’s newsletter. In order to keep the length of that post within reason, I decided against including the recipe for Chocolate Fondue. Good thing! Because today’s highlight is the same recipe from British Columbia’s Take 10 Newsletter winging its way toward the members’ email in-boxes.

Chocolate fondue image - click for source.
Chocolate fondue image – click for source.

Chocolate Fondue (Jean Paré)

  • Good quality chocolate bars such as 3 85g Toblerone or 375 ml semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 125 mL cream
  • Orange flavoured liqueur or juice
  • Break chocolate and stir with cream and liqueur/juice over low heat until melted.
  • Transfer to fondue pot.
  • Dip fruit, etc. and enjoy. (Thin with more cream if it thickens)

Dippers: strawberries, raspberries, pears, bananas, grapes, orange sections, apple wedges, pineapple, melon, mini marshmallows, mini cookies, cake or doughnut cubes, etc. Let you imagination run free when thinking of dippers.

FWIC executives

FWIC executive officers enjoyed this recipe at their meeting at the International Peace Garden. What better way to spend a Saturday evening than with chocolate and great women from across Canada!

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Saskatchewan Women’s Institute Newsletter January/February 2015

As usual, I learned something new when I read the latest from the Saskatchewan Women’s Institute Newsletter. Do you know what Clootie is? No, neither did I. Read on to find out! Thanks to Newsletter Editor Karen A. Gerwing for passing along the file. Below are the highlights. If you’d like to read the entire publication, click on the link here:  SWI0115

SWI is having a raffle to raise funds. Prizes are:

  1. Hand made quilt
  2. Table runner
  3. Gift basket.

Tickets will be $2 each or 3 for $5. Drawing at the SWI Annual conference held at the Western Development Museum in Yorkton May 22, 2015.

The newsletter contains several informative articles including a piece by Audrey Helgason. She  wrote about Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) or what is commonly referred to as scab. It is a fungal disease usually affecting crops such as wheat, barley, oats, rye, canary seed and some forage crops. Clara Simpson submitted a recap of her Canadian Industries Report on industrial hemp – the history and present day uses of the plant.

And then, the food!

Marian Ogrodnick submitted the report from the Valley Lillies WI who met for the first time in 2015. At this meeting the women learned about Scottish cooking and customs. The hostess, Christine Akrigg demonstrated several recipes. The one that caught my eye was this one:

Clootie Dumpling

  • 1 lb. flour
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 2 tsps. cream of tartar , or 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1lb. raisins
  • 1/2lb sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 3 tsps. mixed spice
  • 3 Tbsps. black treacle (molasses)
  • a little milk
  • Mix all ingredients and add enough milk to give a fairly stiff dough
  • Scald a pudding cloth, dredge with flour and place in a basin.
  • Spoon in the pudding mix, tie up the cloth leaving room for expansion
  • Place an old saucer in the bottom of a pan of boiling water, lower the pudding in its cloth on to this
  • Boil 3 to 4 hrs.
  • Turn out on to a hot serving dish and dredge with sugar.
  • Any leftover is good with bacon, eggs, etc.

“What is a clootie?” I asked the gals on Facebook. I didn’t have to wait long for an answer. Joanna Rickert-Hall of the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead responded to my query almost instantly.

It’s Scottish. Clootie is a cloth/rag of sorts, often torn into strips and tied to a tree for a sort of wishing tree as in ‘tie a yellow ribbon round the old oak tree…..”. There are even wells for this as water was often considered to be a holy place to go and reach out to a water deity in a prayer-like manner. Clooties can also be tied in larger squares in order to steam a sort of a pudding.

AHA! Bingo!

Dumpling161109B

The clootie wrapped dumpling top and ready to eat above. Click on the bottom image for image source.
The clootie wrapped dumpling top and ready to eat above. Click on the bottom image for image source.

In closing, I’ll share the craft portion of the newsletter. The heart decorations were from a Christmas craft book. The crafty WI member took the idea and used Women’s Institute

colours to construct 4” x 5” hearts made of felt. They are stuffed with fibrefill. They can be used as ornaments, or you can mount your WI pins on them on your dresser.

SK heart pin cushion craft

 

 

 

Membership Monday – Connecting the UK to BC

Earlier this week we heard from a member of the UK branch in Holmsforth. Sorry, Holmfirth. (There were a few minor glitches, to be expected since Mercury is retrograde and all that.) Our ACWW pen pal member from Nova Scotia sent this message:

England and Wales are celebrating 100 years of WI. One group in a small town of Yorkshire, England contacted me with a request to hear from Canadian WI and association groups as a way of marking this event. Interestingly, their group of 76 members was organized in 2013 by a 26-year old. Members range in age from 23-75 and are diverse, not only in age, but background. I encourage you to write a note to them if you wish.

So, I did. Or I should say, we did. I broadcast the email to all of the provincial federations. Holmfirth will receive our emails any day now and I look forward to a lively exchange over the next few weeks. If you didn’t yet receive the memo, you can contact Michelle at president@holmfirthwi.org.uk

In the meantime, thanks to those aforementioned glitches, I had the pleasure of meeting Fay Van Horn, the president of the Glenwood WI in Smithers BC. This is perfect, I said to myself. I have content for the next Membership Monday post!

BCWI  Fay Van HornClick on the image above to read Fay’s bio. Then use the back arrow in your browser to return to the blog!

Like Calhoun WI on the opposite coast, Glenwood WI is a small group of ten, ages range from 40 to 75. The branch is near Smithers, BC and meetings are held in their own building, Glenwood Hall. Which happens to be the name of their Facebook page, if you’d like to drop by and say, “Howdy.”

Glenwood Hall
Glenwood Hall
Smithers BC
Smithers BC

The branch is very active providing support to Children’s Hospital in Vancouver, and the hospital in Victoria.

Fay writes,

We have a bake sale every February and the money raised goes directly to benefit the children. We have a competition amongst the groups at the end of April each year and take turns hosting. Our competitions this year are a double crust apple pie, a decorated tea towel, a pint of pickles, a tote bag for carrying grocers or other items, a pint of mincemeat, and a lap robe made from felted wool sweaters. Our WI has won for the last few years.

Glenwood supports the ACWW in every way they can. They have made inquiries into finding a pen pal group through ACWW to exchange stories.

Hence, I gather, the interest in contacting the gals from the UK.

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About WI

Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada

We Work for the United Nations

Sheila Needham
Sheila Needham

Last night I told my husband about my latest project. It’s a continuation of the membership profile I wrote about Sheila Needham. On December 9th, 2014, Sheila, who is the Canadian Area President of the Associated Country Women of the World, was interviewed by CBC radio. The station has graciously permitted us to use the recording of the show hosted by Susan Campbell, as a way to promote the Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW).

It’s been fun scouring the internet for photos to use as illustrations to accompany the radio interview.

It’s also been educational, as is the case on some many of the pieces I write for this blog. “Did you know,” I told my hubby, “That the WI has direct ties with the UN?”

“Really?” he said.

“Yup. It starts right at the local branch level. We collect money for the ACWW, and then there are regional and national committees and sub-committees that advise the UN on women’s issues. Cool, eh?”

“Well,” he said. “I guess you work for the UN, then.”

Huh.

I guess we do!

You can watch the video here. Enjoy.

un-building-web

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About WI

Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Closed for the Holiday

Click for Source
Click for Source

The FWIC Office will be closed from December 19, 2014 until January 5, 2015

But we’ll be poking around on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter

Who knows, maybe even here on the blog!

Have a very Merry Christmas and all the best in 2015!

Christmas Gumdrop Cake
Christmas Gumdrop Cake – click on the image for a recipe from Mae Tunnicliffe, Yorkton, Saskatchewan. Mae got the recipe from her mother – this would be in the 1920’s or thereabout.

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About WI

Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.