Saskatchewan Women’s Institute Newsletter January/February 2015

As usual, I learned something new when I read the latest from the Saskatchewan Women’s Institute Newsletter. Do you know what Clootie is? No, neither did I. Read on to find out! Thanks to Newsletter Editor Karen A. Gerwing for passing along the file. Below are the highlights. If you’d like to read the entire publication, click on the link here:  SWI0115

SWI is having a raffle to raise funds. Prizes are:

  1. Hand made quilt
  2. Table runner
  3. Gift basket.

Tickets will be $2 each or 3 for $5. Drawing at the SWI Annual conference held at the Western Development Museum in Yorkton May 22, 2015.

The newsletter contains several informative articles including a piece by Audrey Helgason. She  wrote about Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) or what is commonly referred to as scab. It is a fungal disease usually affecting crops such as wheat, barley, oats, rye, canary seed and some forage crops. Clara Simpson submitted a recap of her Canadian Industries Report on industrial hemp – the history and present day uses of the plant.

And then, the food!

Marian Ogrodnick submitted the report from the Valley Lillies WI who met for the first time in 2015. At this meeting the women learned about Scottish cooking and customs. The hostess, Christine Akrigg demonstrated several recipes. The one that caught my eye was this one:

Clootie Dumpling

  • 1 lb. flour
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 2 tsps. cream of tartar , or 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1lb. raisins
  • 1/2lb sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 3 tsps. mixed spice
  • 3 Tbsps. black treacle (molasses)
  • a little milk
  • Mix all ingredients and add enough milk to give a fairly stiff dough
  • Scald a pudding cloth, dredge with flour and place in a basin.
  • Spoon in the pudding mix, tie up the cloth leaving room for expansion
  • Place an old saucer in the bottom of a pan of boiling water, lower the pudding in its cloth on to this
  • Boil 3 to 4 hrs.
  • Turn out on to a hot serving dish and dredge with sugar.
  • Any leftover is good with bacon, eggs, etc.

“What is a clootie?” I asked the gals on Facebook. I didn’t have to wait long for an answer. Joanna Rickert-Hall of the Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead responded to my query almost instantly.

It’s Scottish. Clootie is a cloth/rag of sorts, often torn into strips and tied to a tree for a sort of wishing tree as in ‘tie a yellow ribbon round the old oak tree…..”. There are even wells for this as water was often considered to be a holy place to go and reach out to a water deity in a prayer-like manner. Clooties can also be tied in larger squares in order to steam a sort of a pudding.

AHA! Bingo!

Dumpling161109B

The clootie wrapped dumpling top and ready to eat above. Click on the bottom image for image source.
The clootie wrapped dumpling top and ready to eat above. Click on the bottom image for image source.

In closing, I’ll share the craft portion of the newsletter. The heart decorations were from a Christmas craft book. The crafty WI member took the idea and used Women’s Institute

colours to construct 4” x 5” hearts made of felt. They are stuffed with fibrefill. They can be used as ornaments, or you can mount your WI pins on them on your dresser.

SK heart pin cushion craft

 

 

 

To Infinity!

December’s Toolkit designed by Ann Mandziuk, FWIC Executive officer, Manitoba, includes links to several YouTube Videos. Three of them offer tutorials for constructing infinity scarves. Click on the bold text in the links below to access the videos.

These have also been posted to our Pinterest board titled Craft it UP!

Need some more inspiration? Here is an image of the first page of free patterns available on Ravelry. There are over 1000 patterns for knit and crochet projects that include the word infinity. Which is about how much time I’d need to reproduce them here, so I’l get you started. Click on the link. If we don’t hear from you, we know where to find you.

Ravelry Search Results for Infinity
Ravelry Search Results for Infinity

 

 

 

Scrap Ribbon Christmas Ornament

Materials Needed:

Sticks (6″ in length)
Ribbon scraps (shades of green and brown work well)
Hot glue gun
Twine
Scissors

Directions:
1. Tie the scraps of ribbon down the stick.
2. Trim the ribbon scraps into the shape of a Christmas tree. After trimming, carefully melt the edges of the ribbons with a candle so the ribbon doesn’t fray.
3. Use the hot glue to attach a piece of twine to the top so the ornament can hang.
These ornaments are beautifully rustic, simple, and can be a fun snowy day craft for the kids!

From the December 2014 Take 10 Bulletin

Scrap-Ribbon-Tree-Ornament1
Click on image for the Fireflies and Mud Pies Blog
scrap-ribbon-tree-ornament-5
Click on the image for the Fireflies and Mud Pies blog

 

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

W.I. Willie the Worm Craft Challenge

Whether individual, branch or provincial, we challenge Women’s Institutes members from across Canada to submit their hand-crafted Willie the Worm for the June 2015 Triennial Convention held in Fredericton, NB.

On your own, or as a team, create a Willie the Worm craft using any materials you please as a fundraiser challenge for FWIC.

Send your completed Willie projects along with the crafter(s)’s names and branch information to the New Brunswick provincial office by June 1, 2015.

New Brunswick Women’s Institute
681 Union Street
Fredericton, NB E3A 3N8
Phone: 506-454-0798 | Email: nbwi@nb.aibn.com

Please note that we are unable to return any projects that are mailed.

Alternately, on the morning of June 9th, 2015, bring your handiwork to the Convention craft table in Fredericton where they will be showcased.

This will be a fun and interactive exhibit. Convention goers will cast their “votes” by donating change for their favourite “Willie the Worm”. At the end of the Convention, the Willie that collects the most attention wins! The winning Worm (and his creator) will receive an official “Thank you” as well as a prize donated by President Elect, Linda Hoy and be recognized as the “Official FWIC Willie the Worm”.

If you need some inspiration, check out our Willie the Worm Pinterest Board.

A very dapper Willie the Worm created by Sara Naim
A very dapper Willie the Worm created by Sara Naim

Please, do share the results of your handiwork. Post photos of not only the final product, but of the crafting event, too. You can find FWIC on Facebook or Twitter. Or drop a message here, in the comments box below.

The Challenge is on!

Hmmm, I wonder what Willie looks like with a moustache? It is Movember, after all…

wi_FWIClogo

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Child’s Craft: A Handy Christmas Ornament

handprint ornament
Image Courtesy The Examiner

These aren’t just five snowmen

As anyone can see.

I made them with my hand

Which is a part of me.

Each year when you trim the tree

You will look back and recall

Christmas of 2014

When my hand was just this small.

 

Directions: Use a sponge brush to apply acrylic paint to your child’s hand. (No worries, it will wash off easily with soap & water). Then, keeping fingers spread, gently put handprint on ornament. It’s OK if the paint smudges a bit. That will help form the curves for the snowman. Once the paint dries, add the hats, eyes, etc with paint or permanent markers. Print the poem and tie to the ornament with a ribbon. (Adding the name and date to the ornament would make it a very personal gift for someone special)